Today's News

  • TSCFD and Red Cross team up to provide smoke alarms

    As part of the American Red Cross’ Home Fire Campaign, the American Red Cross is partnering with the Taylorsville-Spencer County Fire Department and other community partners to install smoke alarms where needed in the city of Taylorsville on Saturday, October 8th.

    Seven times a day someone in this country dies in a home fire. Countless others suffer injuries. To combat these tragic statistics, the Red Cross has launched a nationwide campaign to reduce the number of deaths and injuries due to home fires by 25 percent over the next five years.

  • Students injured in Shelby bus wreck

    An accident Tuesday morning left one bus in the ditch near Shelby County High School’s rear entrance and several students in the gym to be checked by EMS.

    A bus with no students on board was left on its side on Rocket Lane after being hit by another bus on Tuesday morning.

    Two buses collided just after 8:30 a.m., and one bus was left on its side. That bus had no students on board at the time of the accident. The other bus, No. 1121, did have students and all were escorted into the Shelby County High School gymnasium.

  • Comer thinks hemp has bright future in Kentucky

    Hemp has come a long way, increasing from 33 acres in 2014 — the first legal crop in Kentucky — to more than 922 acres planted this year.

    “Welcome to Kentucky, the leading industrial hemp-producing state in the country. It feels good to say that,” Agriculture Commissioner James Comer told a sold-out crowd Monday at the annual Hemp Industries Association Conference in Lexington.

  • New land trust incudes nearby counties

    A newly formed land trust announced Thursday with the purpose of preserving farmland and greenspace in Jefferson and surrounding counties will include Shelby County.

    “We would include all of Shelby County in what we call our service area,” said Louise Allen, executive director of the Limestone Land Trust, a new nonprofit organization with a mission to negotiate private conservation easement agreements in order to conserve land in perpetuity.

  • Agriculture - Autumn tips for your garden

    Fall is a beautiful time in Kentucky gardens, but it can also be a messy time. Tree leaves turn from green to vibrant fall colors and then drop, creating big piles. Then there are the leaf and spent shoots from our flower beds.

    The way we address our yard waste can have a significant impact on our gardens and on the environment. Gardeners commonly rake up and bag leaves to haul away to yard waste dumps.

    This option, while tidy, uses a lot of energy, both yours and the energy to transport the leaves and mixed garden waste.

  • Agriculture - Spiders signal fall

    I’m not frightened by spiders; this doesn’t mean that I want them crawling on me. I enjoy seeing them in the garden this time of the year. They seem to be everywhere: between the chair and the umbrella, in the frame of the garage door, across the window frame in the office, and across the path through Daddy’s Japanese Garden. This last one sometimes elicits panic because I have a tendency to forget about it at night and end up walking through it on the way to close up the chickens for the night. I like spiders, but I don’t want one on my shoulder.

  • Book touts Kentucky black history

    The roles of African Americans may often have been underplayed in history books about Kentucky, but a six-year effort to offset that has produced the first in-depth look at the state’s key African Americans and events.

    African Americans were among the earliest settlers of Kentucky dating back to the 1700s and have been an integral part of all facets of life in the state ever since, the new Kentucky African American Encyclopedia says.

  • Protecting the unborn

    In my travels I often hear about the many ways that Washington fails to stand up and fight for worthy causes. Among the most notable is the fight to protect innocent life. That’s why last summer I said that a new Republican majority would prioritize legislation that aims to protect unborn children after 20 weeks in the womb, and that’s why I will be proud to vote for it this coming week.

  • Clock bomb story a ‘dud’

    The most exercise many Americans today get is sitting in front of their computer screens or televisions and rushing to judgment or jumping to conclusions. While these exercises don’t help us burn calories, they do help agenda-driven journalists in their quest to fan flames.

    Last year we saw it in Ferguson, Missouri, and last week we saw it in Irving, Texas, where a 14-year-old boy was punished by school authorities for bringing a ‘clock’ to school that resembled a homemade bomb.

  • Ready for work

    Several years ago, this newspaper ran a photograph taken at the county line on Highway 155 going into Louisville. The purpose of the picture was to illustrate the seemingly never-ending string of cars that crossed the border each day, taking their occupants to jobs elsewhere.

    Of course, that was prior to the recession of 2008, when Spencer County was repeatedly listed as the fastest growing county in the state of Kentucky, and one of the fastest growing in the entire U.S.