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Today's News

  • SCHS splits in tourney action

    The Spencer County Bears completed a 2-2 swing throught the Lloyd Memorial Invitational Tournament last week but felt it should have been better.

    After an opening-round 81-64 loss to a very quick Covington Holmes squad, the Bears bounced back to win a thrilling 48-47 contest over Bishop Brossart.

    The Bears then squared off against Cooper High School and dropped a heartbreaker of a game, 51-50.
    In that game, the Bears led most of the way, but lost on a tip-in at the buzzer.

  • School district's head lice policy could change

    The Spencer County School District could have a new policy soon on how to deal with head lice, citing the old policy as being unjust and outdated.

  • Personnel changes approved at first Fiscal Court meeting

    One longtime employee of the county was replaced and others had their positions modified as part of a marathon Fiscal Court meeting on Monday.

    The incoming court, which included new Judge Executive Bill Karrer, made the personnel announcements at the close of a six-and-half-hour meeting — more than half of which was spent in state-authorized private executive session.

  • Local fire department viewed as a model merger

    (Editor’s note: The following article was written by The Springfield Sun newspaper as part of a continuing series looking at local fire department issues.)

    The City of Springfield and Washington County are currently served by two separate fire departments. Each department operates on its own budget, with its own sources of income. However, the departments are primarily made up of the same firefighters doing the work when a fire arises.

  • Less waste for the money

    City of Taylorsville officials have elected to pursue a downsized version of a mandated wastewater treatment plant expansion after initial construction bids came back much higher than anticipated.

    The Taylorsville City Commission, in a special meeting Dec. 29, unanimously voted to approve several cost-cutting measures for the proposed expansion and enter into “competitive negotiations” with contractors who a few weeks earlier submitted the three lowest bids on the original design.

  • Sheriff saga: Who’s on First?

    Ringing in the new year was hardly done in a traditional way for Spencer County Sheriff Buddy Stump.

    Stump, who last November won a narrow election over sitting sheriff Steve Coulter, scrambled to assemble a staff on New Year’s Eve when Coulter confirmed his rumored early resignation — two days before the state-mandated end to his term.

  • Contractor offering reward in copper wire theft

    A theft of about $12,000 in copper wire from a local construction site has prompted the contractor to offer a reward in connection with the crime.

  • School buses may have fenced home soon

    Spencer County School District officials are considering fencing in a bus storage lot at the intersection of Main Cross and Back Alley that has been a point of concern for bus drivers and Spencer County Board of Education members.

    At the November board meeting, member Sandy Clevenger discussed that several drivers approached her with issues relating to bus vandalism and safety, noting parked buses could not be locked and were subject to any pedestrians or vandals passing by the lot.

  • Looking ahead, looking behind

    "Year's end is neither an end nor a beginning, but a going on, with all the wisdom that experience can instill in us.” – Hal Borland, writer

    Year-ender things.

    2010 had high and low lights and a few in between.

    Never mind the latter, savor the former.

    A few of mine.

  • Record wild turkey harvest a top story in 2010

    FRANKFORT — A record wild turkey harvest, the return of the alligator gar and south-central Kentucky received two new wildlife management areas, are just some of the highlights of the past year.

    Here’s a look back at some of the top outdoors stories of 2010:

    TURKEY HARVEST

    Hunters took a record 36,094 wild turkeys during the state’s 23-day spring season, which closed May 9.