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Today's News

  • City police active in county

    Taylorsville City Police Chief Phil Crumpton said his department has noticed an increase in calls for assistance and responses in the county since Spencer County Sheriff Buddy Stump announced that his deputies would no longer be offering 24/7 patrols early last month.

    Crumpton told members of the Taylorsville City Commission last week that his officers have probably doubled their runs out in the county. Upon researching the actual statistics, Crumpton said Monday the increase is even greater than that.

  • Stiffer penalties for DUI in KY

    A recent change in Kentucky’s drunken driving laws will bring harsher penalties for some re-offenders.

    Senate Bill 56 extends the look-back period for DUI offenses from five years to 10 years.

    In the Kentucky court system, driving while under the influence is an enhanceable offense, meaning penalties and fines become stiffer for each charge accrued within a certain time period. At the fourth DUI within that time period, the charge is upgraded from a misdemeanor to a felony.

  • Agriculture - Proper plant propagation

    The most common form of plant propagation is digging and dividing, which is best done in early spring before new growth, or in the fall before plants go dormant. Digging and dividing is great for herbaceous plants, but those plants that are considered woody ornamentals do not divide as easily with a spade. In this case, we can look to the technique of rooting out softwood cuttings from the mother plant.

  • What’s happening - Week of May 11, 2016

    Legislative Update at Farm Bureau May 14

    A legislative update with Sen. Jimmy Higdon and Rep. James A. Tipton will be held at the Farm Bureau office to discuss issues affecting Spencer County on Saturday, May 14, at 9 a.m. Coffee and doughnuts will be served, and the community is invited to attend.

    Kentucky Gourd Art Show

  • A history of national prayer

    Americans gathered to pray last week, in small towns and big cities. The National Day of Prayer is an annual event born from the patriotic spirit of our Founding Fathers.

    Unlike our current President, our Founding Fathers did not tiptoe around which diety they prayed to and history is chock full of evidence of those prayers.

    In September of 1774, after news that British troops had confiscated gunpowder supplies in Boston, tensions were high as the Continental Congress assembled in Philadelphia.

  • Students tackle issues

     

    EDITOR’S NOTE: As part of their senior projects, several seniors research an issue and submit a letter to the newspaper explaining their stand and what they’ve learned. We publish these unedited, as submitted.

    Addicted Youth: PATRICK ROOD

  • SCHS Senior has a heart and head for business

     

    On the brink of graduating from Spencer County High School, Rachel Ferriell has big plans. She knows what degrees she wants to earn and where she wants to earn them. She has an exact career in mind.

    She has a business plan – a minutely detailed plan – for a specific store she intends to open.

  • Students to present Mary Poppins

     

    Spencer County high school and middle school students are bringing one of the most beloved movie characters to the stage this week.

    The drama programs at both schools have collaborated to produce Mary Poppins, with showings beginning Thursday and going through Sunday.

    Drama teacher Shelby Steege, who is over the theater departments for both schools, said there are over 75 young people involved in the musical.

  • Education - Three selected for MSU program

     

    The Commonwealth Honors Academy (CHA) is an exciting, challenging three-week academic, social and personal growth program for outstanding high school students who have completed their junior year. Students will be selected from the Commonwealth and surrounding region. Upon completion of the Academy, students will:

    • receive six hours of university credit

    • have the opportunity to take three hours of tuition-free university courses at Murray State University during the subsequent fall and spring semesters

  • Education - Tipton a Governor’s Scholar

     

    Sarah Tipton, of Spencer County, and a junior at Cornerstone Christian Academy in Shelbyville, was recently selected as a Governor’s Scholar.