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Today's News

  • BACK IN TIME: 30 years ago - Lake opens with dedication ceremony
  • Two local students to attend KFB's Institute for Future Ag Leaders

    Ninety-four high school juniors from 60 counties across the state have accepted invitations to attend Kentucky Farm Bureau’s 28th annual Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders held in two locations this month.
    Spencer Countians Darilyn Browning and Tyler Goodlett will be two of the 48 students attending the institute at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.

  • In The Garden: Barn swallow population soaring at the farm

    Swallow Rail was the name my dad gave the farm more than 30 years ago. He wanted it to be relevant, reflecting the spatial and natural qualities of his 18 acres in Western Shelby County. His inspiration came from the swallows that swoop and swerve so adeptly in open fields, catching insects on the fly. The rail of Swallow Rail comes from the two railroad tracks that flank either end of the road.

  • Farming Facts: Fireflies porivde nighttime beauty and control garden pests

    Remember how much fun it was to chase fireflies when you were young? Once you caught a firefly, you would hold it in your hand to watch the flickering light for a few moments and then release it unharmed to fly away.

  • Church Happenings - June 12 Edition

    Wakefield Baptist plans Bible school
    Bible school at Wakefield Baptist Church runs through Friday from 6:30 to 8:30 each night.
    The church is located at 5517 Taylorsville Road.
    The theme for Bible school will be Bible Heroes.

    Kaufmans to sing at Christian Crossing
    The Kaufman Family will sing at Christian Crossing Lifeline Center during revival Friday through Sunday.
    Services on Friday and Saturday are at 7 p.m. The service on Sunday is at 11 a.m.

  • Faith For Today: God - Three in one

    John 8:48-59 says,

  • Faith For Today: Feeling stretched to the max?

    Rubber bands, you probably have some in a drawer somewhere or maybe holding a stack of photos together. They stretch and you can use them to hold things together, or, if you are so inclined, you could shoot them at a family member occasionally. Or you could even stretch them out and play a little tune.
    But have you ever noticed what happens when you stretch a rubber band out for too long?  After a while it loses its ability to snap back. Whether it is a rubber band or a pair of stretch pants, or even a pair of socks, stress them too much and they stop working.

  • Public Record - Taylorsville Police Citations

    The Taylorsville Police Department issued the following citations from May 27 to June 1:

    Dustin A. Bielefeld, 18, of Mt. Everest Drive in Louisville, was cited May 27 for no registration plates and no registration receipt.

    Octavio Vasquez, 44, of Minors Lane in Louisville, was cited May 27 for no operator’s-moped license and failure to produce insurance card.

    Elvis Galindo, 22, of Village Drive in Shelbyville, was cited May 27 for failure to wear seat belts.

  • Counselor's Corner: Father's Day - a day to honor him

    Father, dad, daddy, papa — these are the many names given to a man by his children. It is a wonderful privilege to be known by any of these names.
    So let’s spend some time together as it relates to what this name really means, and how to live up to the expectations therein.
    First of all, this column will address only those things which will benefit and enhance the term attached to the man referred to by his offspring, whether as the birth, adoptive, foster or stepfather, and any other name which has been accepted by him and his family.

  • The Savvy Senior: Lost life insurance?

    Dear Savvy Senior,
    When my father passed away we thought he had a life insurance policy, but we haven’t been able to track it down. Do you know of any resources that might help?
    Searching Family

    Dear Searching,
    Lost or forgotten life-insurance policies are actually quite common in the U.S. In fact, it’s estimated that around $1 billion in benefits from unclaimed life-insurance policies are waiting to be claimed by their rightful beneficiaries.