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Today's News

  • Officials host groundbreaking for water project

    The City of Taylorsville broke ground on its $3.4 million wastewater expansion plant project June 23.

  • Bear Care moves to TES

    The Spencer County School District’s Bear Care child enrichment program is again facing change as school board members voted last week to move its location from Spencer County Elementary to Taylorsville Elementary due to space constraints.
    The program’s existence has been questioned several times by the board because of its ability to financially sustain itself and now has been moved to TES because SCES is expected to be at capacity this school year. The room the program currently operates out of is needed for instruction space, Superintendent Chuck Adams said.

  • Competency hearing set for Mount Eden man accused in nephew’s stabbing death

    A Mount Eden man accused in the stabbing death of his nephew in December 2007 is scheduled for a competency hearing in circuit court Thursday.
    George T. Henderson allegedly stabbed his nephew, Phillip Ray Bentley Jr., two days before Christmas in 2007.
    Bentley was 48 years old at the time of his death.
    Police reports indicated that the victim likely bled to death after being stabbed once near the left shoulder with a seven-inch butcher knife.

  • Murder trial on hold

    Raymond Revard Jr. was in Spencer County Circuit Court on Monday morning, but the fate of the man accused of murdering his wife two and a half years ago is still uncertain.
    Lea Revard, 39, was found lying on the kitchen floor of her home in January 2009 with a gunshot wound at the back of her head.
    Revard’s attorneys, Stephen Miller and Jeff Stovall, were present with their client on Monday for a scheduled hearing in front of Judge Charles Hickman.

  • Lyons to leave post as principal of SCHS

    Spencer County High School Principal Jocelyn Mills Lyons announced via email Monday evening that she would be leaving the Spencer County school system.
    Lyons, who has been principal at the school for two years, said she has accepted an assistant principal position with Jefferson County Public Schools.
    Lyons also served as an assistant principal at Spencer County Middle School in 2006-07.

  • EDA to close July 31

    The Taylorsville-Spencer County Economic Development Authority will officially close its doors July 31, 2011.
    Though the city and county funding will end with the fiscal year on Thursday, all parties involved agreed July 31 would be a legitimate timeline to close down the office, said Charlie Tichenor, the attorney hired by the EDA to assist in its closure.
    Tichenor told board members at Monday night’s EDA meeting that the city and county realize a business can’t close down overnight and agreed to allot an extra month.

  • Board releases superintendent’s evaluation

    The Spencer County Board of Education recently released Superintendent Chuck Adams’ annual summative evaluation scores, and the numbers reveal disagreement among board members as to how effectively Adams is leading the district.

  • Dozens work to clean park trails

    “I found a gold mine down here,” shouted Denny Markwell to others when he discovered a fresh collection of garbage near the shores of Taylorsville Lake.

  • Wilt caused by more than heat in vegetable patch

    I can hardly wait for this year’s first harvest of summer squash.  Last year was a bust because of the heat; so, I have high hopes for a bumper squash crop this year. Mostly, gardeners complain about losing their plants to the squash vine borer; but, I have managed to offset that pest pressure by delaying planting in order to miss peak egg-laying time.  I have also used row covers, lifting them in the morning so bees can do their pollinating, then covering them during the day when mama wasp of the vine borer does her work. 

  • Active weather pattern could hold key to Kentucky agriculture

    Coming out of the wettest combined April and May on record, Kentucky agriculture producers are dealing with a multitude of problems including flooding and increased disease.

    University of Kentucky College of Agriculture meteorologist Tom Priddy said data from Jan. 1 to May 31 reveals Kentucky’s wettest year on record with an average 31.38 inches of rainfall statewide. That figure surpasses the previous record of 31.18 inches set in 1950.