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Today's News

  • High school ACT scores on the upswing

    Four years ago Spencer County High School juniors – alongside  all of  Kentucky’s public high school juniors – were for the first time required by the state to take the ACT as part of the state assessment tests.

  • Judge sets next court date for former sheriff

    After appearing in circuit court last Wednesday, former sheriff Steve Coulter is scheduled for a pretrial conference on Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 1 p.m.

    Coulter is charged with tampering with public records and second-degree official misconduct.

    Though still a Spencer County case, last week’s disposition hearing took place in Shelby County before Judge Stephen Mershon.

    Judge Charles Hickman, who normally presides over circuit court cases in Spencer County, disqualified himself from the case.

  • Progressive Dinner to feature music, Italian cuisine

    Although questions arose about its future earlier this year, the third-annual Taylorsville Progressive Dinner will once again bring upscale character to downtown on Sept. 24.

    The dinner is a six-course semi-formal meal that showcases local businesses, organizations, music, cuisine and historical Main Street locations. Participants move at their own pace from stop to stop, enjoying appetizers, salad, soup, a main course, a wine and cheese tasting and desserts.

  • ON STRIKE: Taylorsville IMI employees strike with Teamsters Local 89

    The effects of a strike involving Irving Materials Inc. workers are being felt this week at the concrete supplier’s Taylorsville plant on Ky. 55 south.

    Members of the Teamsters Local Union 89 declared a strike last week after negotiations between the union and IMI failed to produce a new three-year contract. The terms of the negotiations, which were not made public, included wages, seniority benefits and cutting incentive pay, according to picketers at the Taylorsville site Monday afternoon.

  • Man indicted in cycling death

    A Taylorsville man was indicted last Wednesday as a result of a collision that killed a Louisville Metro Police officer last September.

    A Spencer County grand jury indicted Daryl Fogle, 38, of Taylorsville, with second-degree manslaughter following an almost yearlong investigation by the Kentucky State Police.

    Taylorsville resident Paul Pegram was struck by a vehicle driven by Fogle on Sept. 30, 2010 as he was riding his bike along Ky. 248. Pegram later died at a Louisville hospital.

  • Mt. Eden Post Office to close Friday

    Another link in the Mount Eden community chain will be removed Friday when the post office closes its doors.

    A notice has been posted on the office doors for some time and United States Post Office officials confirmed Monday that the office will close at the end of business Friday.

  • POLL: Do you remember where you were on 9/11?

    Do you remember where you were on 9/11?

    Click here to vote!

  • COLUMN: New columnist to address a myriad of family issues

    By Dr. JOHN LAPP, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

    Editor’s note: The Spencer Magnet welcomes columnist Dr. John Lapp to our regular list of contributing writers. Dr. Lapp has decades of experience as a professional psychologist and counselor.
    Well, how do we begin a new column in the Spencer Magnet? How about an introduction to some topics, beginning with this one: marriage.

  • Container gardening offers options for fall growing season

    The summer planting season is nearly over, but it is not too late to plan for next year or even for this fall in the garden. Fall crops can be planted in containers, and raised beds can be prepared to be ready for next spring. Using containers and raised beds can help a gardener get more enjoyment out of less work.

  • Kentucky was a Union state during the Civil War

    A map of the Confederate States of America shows Kentucky among the states that seceded from the Union prior to the American Civil War.

    Artist George Kirchner of Brentwood, Tenn., says he drew the map and based it on acts of the Kentucky Confederate Legislature and Congress of the Confederate States of America. Under those criteria, he also lists Missouri and the Arizona territory as also parts of the Confederacy.