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Today's News

  • Rhubarb, the taste of nostalgia

    Rhubarb is a nostalgic vegetable that many Spencer County residents remember from childhood.

    “My daddy always had rhubarb,” said Mary Snyder, who lived on a 400-acre farm near High Grove for many years.

    Snyder, who was “born and raised just over the Nelson County line near Bloomfield,” said that when her father cleaned out the hen house, he would put the manure around the rhubarb patch to fertilize it.

    “We always had nice fat big stalks, bigger than your thumb,” said Snyder.

  • Baird attends agriculture leadership conference

    Dr. Larry Jones,  associate dean for academic programs at the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture (left), and Mark Haney, president of Kentucky Farm Bureau (right), greeted Stetson Baird, of Taylorsville, and the 43 other high school students selected from around the state to attend the Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders (IFAL), sponsored by Kentucky Farm Bureau.

  • In memory of Elwood Maddox, Sr.

    The St. Matthews Lions Club recently presented a new Lions flag to the Spencer County chapter in memory of Charter Member Lion Elwood Maddox, Sr. for his 19 years of outstanding service to the Spencer County Lions Club. Maddox, who passed away June 15, 2009, served as president, past president, past treasurer and past director. He was also a former grand marshall and chairman of the Eye Foundation and was a “Lions Camper” at Camp Crescendo in Lebanon Junction.

     

  • Cox’s Creek farmer reappointed to tobacco board

    Brian Scott Travis, of Cox’s Creek, has been reappointed by Gov. Steve Beshear  to the Kentucky Tobacco Research Board. Travis, a self-employed farmer, will serve for a term expiring July 15, 2012.

    Other appointees to the board are Paige Shumate Short, of Paris, and Roger Thomas, of Smiths Grove. Short is president of Kentucky Textiles Technology. Thomas is executive director of the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy.

  • Discover benefits of canning

    Pickling foods is one of the simplest methods of preserving the harvest, and has been practiced for centuries.

    Lora Cheek and her mother Mary Snider have been making pickles off and on since Cheek was a child. Until last summer, though, they had not canned together in 20 years.

     Patty Davis watched her mother make pickles on the counter when she was growing up. She used to make pickles with her mother-in-law, but does not make them much anymore.

  • Event for pregnant teens

    Kings Baptist Church, located at 989 Kings Church Rd,, will be hosting the Baby Boot Camp Saturday, July 24 from 9:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. This event is for expectant teenage moms, 22 weeks along, and will be providing education about the baby as you prepare for childbirth. Continental breakfast and a hot lunch will be provided. Special surprise at the end of the day.

    For more information, or to reserve a spot, call 538-6902 or 955-5480 or email office@kingsbaptist.net.

     

  • Business venture keeps couple in one spot

    Despite being surrounded by her new extended family in Mt. Eden, Linda Henson still gets lonely from time to time..

    For 20 years, she and husband Jim were a truck-driving team whose travels took them to nearly every state and throughout Canada.

    Their nomadic life on the road together came to a halt last October when they purchased what was originally the Mt. Eden Ruritan Club Fire Dept.

    It was the fulfillment of a long-time goal for the couple who reside on Murphy’s Lane in Spencer County.

  • Gulf oil spill recovery: Advice for those wanting to help

    By the Better Business Bureau

  • Spiders and snakes: when not to be scared

     “I don’t like spiders and snakes…” are the lyrics to the catchy 1970s tune by singer Jim Stafford.  Although the song has little to do with wildlife, the sentiment holds true for many whose fear, when they cross paths with a common snake or spider, is real even when the perceived danger isn’t.  

  • Mission to Guatemala

    For one Spencer County family, a recent mission trip to Guatemala was life-changing. Eleven-year-old Jalei Cox and her sister Makenna, 10, saw first-hand the level of poverty that exists in the world.

    “I definitely think God wanted us to go,” said Makenna, “so we could see how great we have it here.”