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Today's News

  • Sheriff saga: Who’s on First?

    Ringing in the new year was hardly done in a traditional way for Spencer County Sheriff Buddy Stump.

    Stump, who last November won a narrow election over sitting sheriff Steve Coulter, scrambled to assemble a staff on New Year’s Eve when Coulter confirmed his rumored early resignation — two days before the state-mandated end to his term.

  • Contractor offering reward in copper wire theft

    A theft of about $12,000 in copper wire from a local construction site has prompted the contractor to offer a reward in connection with the crime.

  • School buses may have fenced home soon

    Spencer County School District officials are considering fencing in a bus storage lot at the intersection of Main Cross and Back Alley that has been a point of concern for bus drivers and Spencer County Board of Education members.

    At the November board meeting, member Sandy Clevenger discussed that several drivers approached her with issues relating to bus vandalism and safety, noting parked buses could not be locked and were subject to any pedestrians or vandals passing by the lot.

  • Looking ahead, looking behind

    "Year's end is neither an end nor a beginning, but a going on, with all the wisdom that experience can instill in us.” – Hal Borland, writer

    Year-ender things.

    2010 had high and low lights and a few in between.

    Never mind the latter, savor the former.

    A few of mine.

  • Record wild turkey harvest a top story in 2010

    FRANKFORT — A record wild turkey harvest, the return of the alligator gar and south-central Kentucky received two new wildlife management areas, are just some of the highlights of the past year.

    Here’s a look back at some of the top outdoors stories of 2010:

    TURKEY HARVEST

    Hunters took a record 36,094 wild turkeys during the state’s 23-day spring season, which closed May 9.

  • Coulter says goodbye, for now

    When Steve Coulter hands over the keys to the Spencer County Sheriff’s Office to Buddy Stump at the first of the year, he will leave with few regrets.

    “I am proud of what we have done,” said Coulter, who has been county sheriff since 1994. “I think we have served the citizens well.”

    Again, he will leave with few regrets. But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have any: “I just hate that it had to end this way,” he said.

  • SCHS rebounds from first loss with win over Trimble

    The Spencer County Bears rebounded from their first loss of the season with a victory over Trimble County last week and will head north this week for a tough test before getting into district play after the holidays.

    The Bears suffered a tough 61-60 loss on a last-second shot against a traveling team from Australia the week before Christmas, but had a chance to get back on the winning track before the holiday break when they traveled to Bedford on Dec. 21 to take on the Raiders, a team they already handled easily earlier in the season.

  • Lady Bears snare first win

    The Spencer County Lady Bears picked up their first win of the season last week as they opened up play in the Campbellsville Food Pantry Classic girls high school basketball tournament, knocking off the host Lady Eagles, 51-39, on Dec. 20.

    The girls fell behind early, trailing 15-11 after one quarter, but quickly surged ahead in the second quarter and led 25-19 at the intermission. The Lady Bears would increase that lead in the second half to secure the victory.

  • COLUMN: Expensive beef? Blame it on the demand for corn

    It’s not just the cost of transportation that can affect meat prices. Fuel — or more accurately, ethanol — plays a part on another level, according to a University of Kentucky agricultural economist. And it all goes back to corn.

  • Attention Green Thumbs

    I like a book that tells a story while teaching me a little something along the way; I like when the writer’s personality is revealed in their prose; and I like when a book makes me feel like I am not the only one that marvels at what nature and people can do. Here are my 2010 picks for just this sort of thing.

    I loved “Insectopedia” by Hugh Raffles (Random House 2010). This book is a collection of essays, experiences, musings, and some journalism. Raffles explores the natural world and our relationship to it (or our lack there of).