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Today's News

  • COLUMN: Spring has sprung and it’s time to thaw out and recycle

    We have seen a break in the cooler temperatures we have had since March, so we can now plan our events. Our non-profit groups are in the middle of our Spring Roadside Litter Cleanup, so the warmer weather will be an aid for their efforts.
    If you have a collection of outdated, not needed private files accumulated (think old tax returns) do not forget that this coming Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon, the Spencer County Public Library will host the Shred It Company, which offers free shredding for your old private papers. The truck will be at the library parking lot.

  • COLUMN: Lessons learned from tragedy

    On Sept. 11, 2001, I was a junior in high school. If I took you back to my hometown and we walked the halls of Bell County High, I could point to the spot where I stood when I heard about the first plane hitting the World Trade Center. I could walk you through the classrooms I sat in and watched the nonstop coverage of the attacks on America. I could recall the sick feeling in my stomach and the fear racing through my mind.
    Eleven years and seven months later, that same sick feeling returned to me as I sat at my desk here at The Spencer Magnet.

  • PHOTO: An educational lunch

    Spencer County High School Spanish I students in Miss Reno and Mrs. Dunaway’s classes traveled to Fiesta Brava for lunch on March 28. The students were finishing up a unit on restaurants and were able to use their newly learned vocabulary with the staff at Fiesta Brava.

  • PHOTO: Making a birdhouse

    Students in Janet Barnett’s SOS class learned how to make birdhouses out of gourds. SOS classes are still ongoing. For more information, visit spencerextension.com

  • AG: Fiscal court didn’t violate open meetings act

    The Spencer County Fiscal Court did not violate open meeting laws by meeting on Sept. 5, 2012, but it did violate a Kentucky statute by not responding to a complaint regarding that meeting, according to an opinion issued by the Attorney General’s office on April 3.
    The Fiscal Court met on the first Wednesday in September 2012 instead of the first Monday because the first Monday was Labor Day. This is a procedure set out in the county’s administrative code.

  • County to take legal action against former clerk, again

    The Spencer County Fiscal Court is again taking legal action against former County Clerk Judy Puckett. This time the court seeks to obtain $28,399, which an audit of Puckett’s last 11 months in office indicates she owes back to the county.
    Magistrates Hobert Judd and Woodie Cheek were absent from Monday night’s meeting, but Judge-Executive Bill Karrer and Magistrates Mike Moody, David Goodlett and Jerry Davis voted unanimously to authorize the county attorney to pursue these monies through all necessary legal action.

  • Radio tower issue lingers

    Though the radio tower erected at the Spencer County Fairgrounds has been up and operational for several months, it remains unclear whether the Kentucky Department of Housing, Buildings and Construction has had the opportunity to inspect the structure.
    Magistrate Mike Moody, who represents the district where the new tower is located, said he is concerned that the structure hasn’t been inspected or granted the proper permits by the state.
    On Tuesday, Moody said that to his knowledge, there has been no inspection by the state.

  • Forged notes could mean jail time for students

    Attempts to get a couple extra days off from school could land some middle and high school students with felonies on their records and possible jail time.
    Taylorsville Police Chief Toby Lewis announced last week that his department has seen an increase in instances where Spencer County Middle and Spencer County High School students are forging doctors’ notes.

  • Forever an inspiration: Dawson’s journey fueled community outreach, support

    For Dawson Moore, life was not measured by the number of years he lived, but more by the number of people whose lives he touched.

  • Hemp bill becomes law

    Following bipartisan support from both chambers of the Kentucky General Assembly, Gov. Steve Beshear announced Friday that he would allow the “hemp bill” to become law without his signature.
    The hemp bill is Senate Bill 50, Sen. Paul Hornback’s legislation that creates an administrative framework for industrial hemp production in Kentucky.
    At nearly the last minute of the 2013 legislative session, the House passed the bill by a margin of 88-4 and the senate concurred in a House floor amendment by a vote of 35-1.