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Today's News

  • Property transfers – 4/13

    The following property transfers were recently collected from the Spencer County Clerk’s Office:

    Geraldine Simpson, Mount Eden to Jill Burgan Whitehouse, Ernest Whitehouse and Johnnie Saunders, Mount Eden, a tract of land near Ky. 636, as described in deed book 237 page 399, $13,200.

    The Ray-Harris Company, LLC, Elizabethtown, to James C. Dowden and Marilyn Dowden, Fisherville, lot 28 of Fox Lair Subdivision, as described in deed book 237 page 408, $353,137.53.

  • District court proceedings from Jan. 4 & 7

    The following civil case was heard in Spencer County Circuit Court Jan. 4, 2011, by Judge Donna Dutton:

    Country Day Apartments v. Dutchess Price, eviction hearing, judgment in favor of the plantiff.

    The following cases were heard in Spencer County District Court Jan. 7, 2011, by Judge Donna Dutton:

    Traffic:
    Norma L. Stone, speeding 10 miles over the speed limit, pled guilty, state traffic school, $143 court costs.

  • Local farmer gives class on living gluten free

    Sarah Fauber of Riversong Farm taught an SOS class on Becoming Gluten Free on April 9. There were eight attendees.
    Shannon Depew, who has lived in Spencer County 7 1/2 years, attended the class to learn more about gluten free eating because she and her daughter have milk allergies. Even though they are doing much better, she suspects a wheat allergy also.
    Gluten is a combination of proteins found in grains. Barley, wheat and rye specifically cause a reaction in people who are sensitive to gluten.

  • A Bloomfield ‘romantic tragedy’

    It is one of Bloomfield’s more significant stories.
    It’s the intriguing tale of Jereboam Beauchamp and Ann Cook who are buried in each other’s arms in the Maple Grove Cemetery.

  • COLUMN: Cal to the Knicks is circle talk

    Before shifting to Basketball Season III – spring recruit signings this week – and before coach carousel rumors, what-ifs and third-guesses carry us away – a few reflections on Seasons I and II.
    First, John Calipari leaving Kentucky any time soon is circle talk in Coach Carousel prime time.
    Circle Talk is whisper-in-an-ear, run-around gossip based on insufficient facts to support a conclusion. In sports blog parlance – “throw (something) against a wall and sees if it sticks.”

  • Collecting broodstock an important tool for fisheries

    The phone calls started in the late afternoon along with posts on fishing related web sites. Some anglers recently witnessed the Fisheries Division of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources collecting smallmouth bass broodstock from Dale Hollow Lake and grew concerned something funny just occurred.

  • Bluegrass Speedway opens season Saturday

    Bluegrass Speedway track promoters David and Anita Ferrell are set to present the 17th Annual Season Opener at the 1/2 mile high-banked Nelson County clay oval Saturday evening with a full racing program for all divisions.  
    The season opener on April 16 will feature the 44 Auto Mart Super Late Models in a 25-lap, $1,000-to-win feature event.  The UMP Modifieds will race for $500-to-win in a 20-lap feature event.

  • Local ‘stars’ to dance Friday night away

    What will Spencer County High School Principal Jocelyn Lyons do to top her Beyonce performance at last year’s Dancing with the Stars event?

  • COLUMN: Researchers find key to plant disease resistance

    University of Kentucky plant pathologists recently discovered a metabolite that plays a critical role early on in the ability of plants, animals, humans and one-celled microorganisms to fend off a wide range of pathogens at the cellular level, which is known as systemic immunity. This mode of resistance has been known for more than 100 years, but the key events that stimulate that resistance have remained a mystery.

  • COLUMN: BEWARE: Overmulching can cause serious plant problems

    Every year I write about mulch, but no ones seems to care. Mounds of mulch still choke the trunks of trees everywhere you look this time of the year. Trees in landscapes look like telephone poles sticking out of soon to be crusted over black mulch.
    How’s that for a foreboding tale?
    Here’s the message, too much mulch is a bad thing. I know, some people have been liberated, but we still have more work to do.
    The bottom line: 2 inches of coarse mulch that is not piled around the trunk of the tree or shrub is the desired goal.