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Today's News

  • Spencer County Schools summer program transportation schedule

    Below is the transportation schedule for the Spencer County Schools’ summer enrichment program, as provided by Transportation Director Jack Senior. The program runs from June 18 to July 19. Please allow 10 minutes before and after the scheduled time for pickup and dropoff, Senior said.

    Route    Stop    Pickup    Dropoff
    A-1    Crooked Creek/248 Turn around    8:15 a.m.    3:33 p.m.

  • Bleemel leaves mural as mark on SCHS

    When Spencer County High School teacher Rachel Dunaway asked then-senior Brandi Bleemel to paint a few scenes on some ceiling tiles in her classroom, she knew Bleemel was talented. But how much talent Bleemel possessed surprised even her teacher.

  • BACK IN TIME: Does history repeat itself?
  • COLUMN: Combatting critters in the garden

    If you have a garden chances are you appreciate nature in all its glory.  But, sometimes nature gets in the way of our desires to cultivate.  Deer browsing, rabbit munching, squirrel digging, bird pecking, mole trenching and resident vole feasting have all come up in the last two weeks.  While I have no silver bullet for any of these problems I do have some practical approaches to offset the shared use of our gardens.  

  • COLUMN: Catch mildew on roses before it’s too late

    Spectacular blooms and diverse types and varieties make roses a favorite of many Kentucky gardeners.  However, warm, humid growing conditions create an ideal environment for serious problems each year with black spot and powdery mildew.
    Gardeners can nip these fungal diseases in the bud by planting resistant or tolerant varieties and creating an unfavorable environment for disease development. It may be necessary to use fungicides throughout the summer, especially on susceptible varieties.

  • POLL: Are you in favor of charter government?

    Are you in favor of charter government?

    Click here to vote!

  • COLUMN: ‘Cut your spiritual teeth’ on the book of Acts

    When I grew up on our family farm in Breckenridge County, I stayed with my grandparents a lot. My grandmother had a lot of old sayings. One was when someone was real good at doing something; she would say he or she “cut their teeth on that.” After I received Jesus Christ as my savior and started reading the Bible, I realized that the book of Acts was the most challenging book in the Bible for me and so my grandmother would say “I cut my teeth” on the book of Acts because I read it many, many times.

  • COLUMN: Bible says to make disciples ‘as you go’

    Life is full of little errands and moments and in-between times that we often hurry past.  Yet it is those very moments, those quick drive-by incidents, that can add so much to our lives.  But we get so busy focusing on the big moments that we forget that those little moments can make such a big difference.
    Maybe just a wave and a smile to someone you pass on the street can brighten an otherwise dreary day.  Or maybe in the checkout line the lady in front of you wrangling three kids and a grocery cart could use a smile and a helping hand.

  • COLUMN: Learn lessons from yesterday to preserve the future

    Today, we live in a society that has access to every and any product you can imagine. We tote items to Goodwill stores, to missions, most churches have clothing centers, the list is endless.
    A lot of items, if torn, dented, bent, faded, or otherwise less than perfect is, if not given away, trashed in some manner.
    I am not the oldest man on the planet by far, but my growing up period started a little before the start of World War II.

  • COLUMN: Water customers deserved more thought from city

    What’s the old saying? Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.
    Well, shame on me.
    When the Taylorsville City Commission decided last week to postpone its first reading of the 2012-2013 budget so that commissioners could look into some of the matters brought up as a result of a public hearing last week, I think many attending that meeting felt a slight glimmer of hope.
    You can count me in that group.