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Today's News

  • Civil politics

    There’s nothing civil about war, but that doesn’t always have to apply to the political process that seems to grow nastier, meaner and more vile every election cycle.

    In a sense, politics is a war - a war of ideas and philosophies. I’ve never been a fan of those who say compromise and bipartisanship are always the answer. Politics are partisan by nature, and that’s a good thing. Despite what’s taught in this post-modern world, there remains a difference between right and wrong, good and evil, and often politics are divided on those very lines.

  • Rally for 1st Amendment

     

    The Obergefell decision is final; marriage has been re-defined for these United States. We can argue whether it was done legally, whether it is consistent with American history, and whether it will actually bear fruit as a new social order emerges, but it is now the law of the land.

  • Curtis files as independent candidate for governor

     

    Independent gubernatorial candidate Drew Curtis, with more than 8,000 signatures in hand, officially filed for the 2015 governor race today with his wife Heather Curtis as his running mate.

    Curtis gave a kick-off press conference today on the Capitol stairs saying he is confident he can get more than 20 percent of Kentuckians’ vote in the race for the state house.

  • Public’s input sought on social study standards

    The Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) is seeking public feedback on proposed Social Studies Standards for the Next Generation.

    These future-oriented standards address the knowledge, skills and competencies all Kentucky’s K-12 students should have to be prepared for college, career and civic engagement and to ensure success in the world today.

  • Auditor’s financial tips for districts

    Auditor Adam Edelen last week released 75 recommendations to help school districts become more efficient and effective in their use of taxpayer dollars.

    The recommendations are contained in a report that was developed based on findings during the Auditor’s office examinations of 21 school districts since 2012. Districts are not required to adopt all recommendations in the report; however, they are encouraged to review and identify recommendations that could be implemented in their districts to improve fiscal oversight, Auditor Edelen said.

  • Agriculture - Now is the time to establish late summer forages

    The period from late summer into early fall in Kentucky is the best time to establish the common cool-season grasses such as orchardgrass, tall fescue, timothy and bluegrass for pasture or hay. These four grasses make up 95 percent of pasture acreage.

    Many years of research have shown this time frame is the best opportunity for successful establishment. Mother Nature has a hand in this because seed produced in late spring remains dormant until late summer and then early fall rainfall provides the moisture necessary for the seed to germinate.

  • Agriculture - Local 4-H members bring home awards from Junior Livestock Expo

     

    Local 4-H members Sydney Warren and Case Montgomery fared well July 25 at the Kentucky Junior Livestock Expo at Western Kentucky University Ag Expo Center in Bowling Green.

  • Agriculture - A second chance: Fall gardens offer promise

    I am planting a fall garden for sure this year. The current one is a flop so it is time to start over! The challenge with a fall garden is getting seed and seedlings to germinate and grow during the heat of the end of summer. If temperatures moderate we have a better chance at success. Planting beds are ready since the potatoes have been harvested (and the rotten onions removed) All the debris has been removed and the soil has been prepared with additional compost (remember that every chance you have to add compost do so because it will improve your soil thus improving the crop).

  • Childrens’ posture damaged by electronic devices

    Children are potentially causing harm to their necks and backs playing on smartphones, tablets and other smart devices for long periods of time.

    Societal changes mean children are staying indoors more, due to parents being protective, which leads to more technology use. Instead of playing in the neighborhood, children are more attached to electronic devices.

  • Standing our ground

    Like most Americans, I was very troubled when I heard about the senseless killing of the majestic lion by a dentist from Minnesota. Now don’t get me wrong, this is Kentucky, we hunt, it’s what we do. But somehow, going to a preserve and setting bait, etc, etc, just doesn’t seem very sporting. The country is outraged, and why not?