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Today's News

  • House objects to Senate cuts

    by KENT STEVENS

    State Representative

    With the last full working week of the 2010 legislative session of the Kentucky General Assembly behind us, much was accomplished as we closed in on final details of the state’s budget, road plan and passage of bills.

  • GUEST COLUMN: A budget Kentuckians can live with

    by GARY TAPP

    State Senator

    The Senate passed its version of the budget and we are now working with the House of Representatives in a budget conference committee.  This committee is charged with working out the differences between the House and Senate version of the budget bills.

  • Jury reduces robbery charge

    A Spencer County jury reduced second degree robbery charges for a Mt. Washington man that used a hand-written note to get money from a Country Mart gas station employee last September.

    Curtis A. Blandford, 20, was found guilty of theft by unlawful taking of over $500 Monday in Spencer County Circuit Court.

    The jury recommended that Blandford be sentenced to one and a half years in jail.

    Judge Charles Hickman set Blandford’s sentencing date as May 6.

  • LETTER: Cut waste: Start with politicla signs

    Cut waste: Start with signs

    My hat is off to John Riley for vowing in his campaign for Spencer County Judge Executive not to enter the “political yard sign war” until after May 1.

    Yes, these signs have their usefulness in an election, however the clutter of our highways and neighborhood streets with yard signs months before an election can simply get out of control and become an eyesore.

  • Grand jury indictments

    A Louisville pair was indicted by a Spencer County grand jury Mar. 4 on weapons and theft charges.

    The grand jury delivered a total of six counts against Ned E. Davis, of Louisville, including: tampering with physical evidence, theft by unlawful taking over $300, theft of services under $300, third-degree burglary, carrying a concealed deadly weapon and being a persistent felony offender in the first-degree.

  • Last words provide portrait of Jesus

    Jesus was no more himself than when he hung on the cross as the Savior of the world.  The seven last sayings of Christ display seven portraits of the God-man.  Our view of Jesus would be incomplete had we not seen these very-different vistas of the Messiah.

    Forgiving Any Sin

    “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” 

  • County officials eye new ethics ordinance

    County officials will soon unveil a 14-page ethics ordinance that could replace an older, vaguer one.

    The proposed ordinance strengthens and clarifies the county’s existing policies, which were adopted in 1995. It also establishes policies for officials to avoid conflicts of interest.

    “It’s a much more updated ordinance than we’ve had before,” said magistrate David Henry, who helped draft the proposed codes. 

  • Dancing stars

    The Stars were shining brightly on Friday night at the FFA/Dance Team second annual Dancing with the Stars event. 

    Members of the community joined school and district personnel to put on a show that will have the community talking for quite a while. There were twenty one dance performances ranging from swing to hip-hop. The audience was treated to a head spinning Scott Williams, a Michael Jackson moon walking Chuck Adams and two tail-feather shaking Sheriff Steve Coulter and Kyle Bennett to name a few.

  • Easter happenings

    Good Friday

    Service

    The community-wide Good Friday service will be held at Second Baptist Church Friday at noon. Second Baptist Church is located at 401 Jefferson St., in Taylorsville. Highview Baptist Church Pastor Nick Moore will give the message.

    Family Easter

    Eggstravaganza

  • GUEST COLUMN: An 'appalling piece of legislation'

    by MIKE FARRELL

    In a landmark decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, Justice William Brennan wrote this country has “a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust, and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials.”

    Kentucky legislators failed to honor that principle when they voted to allow elected school board members to evaluate the performance of school superintendents in secret.