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Today's News

  • Lady Bears top district rival Shelby County 5-2

     

    The Spencer County Lady Bears got a huge district win over Shelby County last Wednesday night on the road.

  • Fall composting

    Thirty years ago, if you mentioned soil science, compost, vermiculture or mycorrhizal fungi to the average gardener they would have scratched their head and laughed.  Today these are words that gardeners are beginning to understand and take seriously as they learn the value of adding organic matter to their gardens.  You can buy organic matter or you can generate it yourself You likely have all the tools you need already.

  • Apple harvest basics

    Fall is a busy time for apple growers. Ripening times vary from year to year depending on the weather. If apples have coddling moth damage, they will drop up to two weeks before the crop is ripe.

    The best and most time-tested method of judging when to pick fruit is the taste method. When enough starch has been converted to sugar and the flavor is developed, the fruit is ready to eat. Fruit continues to ripen in cold storage, so pick fruit before it is ripe if you want to store it.

  • State Fair swine show

    Several youth participated in Swine Exhibitions from Spencer County in the 2017 Kentucky State Fair.  In the Kentucky State Fair 4-H/FFA Market Swine Show, Makala Hatzman, Seth Goodlett, Courtney Jeffiers, Noah Dunning, Jenna Thompson, Madison Goodlett, Casey Montgomery, Ethan Thompson, Emily Truax, Desmond Stubbs, Braydon King, Beau Girdley, Ryann Truax, Jillian Dunning, Taylor Goodlett, Brooke Montgomery, Noah Frank, and Hayden Atcher represented Spencer County Novice, 4-H, and FFA in their classes.  

  • Athletic complex ok’d

     

    Work may soon begin on a 5.28 million project at Spencer County High School that will provide much-needed improvements to the athletic facilities, along with additional academic room.

  • City votes to offer chief job, then rescinds

    The City of Taylorsville is still without a police chief following a change of heart among the City Commissioners last week.
    During a meeting last Tuesday, the Commission voted 4-1 to offer the job to current Major David Decker at an hourly rate of $29 per hour. Commissioner Abbigail Nation voted against the motion to offer Decker the job.

    During the same meeting, Commissioner Ellen Redmon agreed to rescind that motion, which took the offer off the table.

  • Animal shelter closes after case of ringworm

    A case of ringworm has temporarily closed the Spencer County Animal Shelter and brought a halt to work inside the county garage because of fears of the disease spreading.

    Animal Control Director Melvin Gore confirmed that a dog at the shelter was brought in with a severe case of ringworm recently. Because there is no isolation or quarantine area, he said other animals and even humans are subject to being infected.

    “It’s highly contagious and all mammals can get it, including humans,” said Gore.

  • Fiscal court errs on vote for clerk

    A parliamentary error at the last fiscal court meeting may shelve an approved motion to cut Spencer County Clerk Lynn Hesselbrock’s project to add storage space for the county’s official records.

  • What’s Happening - Week of September 27, 2017

    Spencer County Animal Shelter dinner fundraiser

    Spencer County Animal Shelter’s 2nd Annual Dinner Fundraiser will be held on Saturday, November 11, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., at the Spencer County Extension Service at 100 Oak Tree Way, Taylorsville. Tickets are $25 each (or) $40 for two.

    The evening will include dinner, entertainment, a silent auction and door prizes.

  • State’s pension system may require $5.4 billion

    Kentucky’s General Assembly will need to find an estimated $5.4 billion to fund the pension systems for state workers and school teachers in the next two-year state budget, officials told the Public Pension Oversight Board on Monday.

    That amount would be a hefty funding increase and a painful squeeze for a state General Fund that — at about $20 billion over two years — also is expected to pay for education, prisons, social services and other state programs.

    There are two reasons for the dramatic increase.