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Today's News

  • Four SCHS students move on to state NHD competition

    Fifteen Spencer County High School students participated in the district National History Day Competition held at the University of Louisville on Saturday, March 21st.  Although all students received great comments from judges on their projects or their interviews, only four placed high enough to move on to state competition.

    Placing 1st in group documentary were Tyler Greenwell and Robert “Bressler” Wade.  Their project was entitled “Nixon: The Individual in History: His Actions Became his Legacy.”

  • DANCING LIKE STARS

    The Spencer County High School Dance team has managed to accomplish in three years what some more established programs have yet to achieve – the title of national champions. The relatively young team earned their new moniker at Jam Fest Nationals two Saturdays ago in Louisville. The girls beat out 39 other dance teams with their fast-paced, hip-hop routine at the invitation-only event.

    “It’s a big deal to say we’re national champions and not just that we won first place,” said SCHS junior and co-captain Chelsea Livingston.

  • PUBLIC RECORDS: District court

    The Honorable Judge Donna Dutton presided over the following cases in District Court on January 23, 2009.

    Misdemeanor:

    Roy H. Wyatt. Assault 4th degree, no visible injury. Amended to harassing. Found guilty. $250 fine, $153 court costs.

    Felony:

  • SCES Dance Team ends season on a high note

    The SCES dance team has wrapped their 2008-2009 dance season. Recently, the team competed in Jamfest Super National in Cincinnati – where they placed first in their category. Then they went on to participate in March Madness Cheer and Dance, placing first in Youth Hip hop and winning the title of Grand Champions. To earn this title, the team had to place first over every other dance team there (including high school and middle school teams).

  • LETTER: Charter quenches thirst for power

    I read in the paper about the deposition of Dwight Martin and James Allen Tipton.  Both are great young men and we are lucky to have them as citizens of the county. No one would ever make me think that Dwight or James Allen would ever doing anything wrong.  I don’t think you could torture them into doing anything that was not 100 percent right, but there is a true perception out there and perceptions are more often as real than not.

  • FATAL VISION

    There may have been a lot of laughter spilling from the middle school gym last Friday, but the subject being taught could not have been more serious.

    The program was called Fatal Vision and was designed to teach students the dangers of substance abuse.

    “One person dies every 36 minutes in the U.S. from an alcohol or drug-related incident,” said Wayne Alexander, of the Kentucky Crime Prevention Coalition.

  • Church happenings

    Risen Lord Wednesday night supper/worship service

    Come join us for supper and worship services tonight, and April 1 at Risen Lord Church, located at 5138 Taylorsville Rd. Supper is at 6 p.m. with the worship service at 7 p.m.  The church will provide soup and sandwiches. Please bring a side dish to share. Call Julie at 502-477-6557 with any questions.

    Old Gospel Barn Special Singing 

  • Judge declares April 'Child Abuse Prevention Month'

    In honor of Child Abuse Prevention Month, Spencer County Judge Executive David Jenkins signed a proclamation Friday, calling on all citizens to increase their efforts to support families by helping to prevent child abuse.

  • School board says teachers will keep their jobs

    Despite a stagnant economy and concerns for the immediate future, the Spencer County School Board voted unanimously Monday night to approve staffing allocations that reflect little change from the current year.

  • LETTER: Paper irreplacable

    As we pass through the time of our community we sometimes forget we are leaving an indelible trail of our concerns, conclusions, rational and irrational judgments. We sometimes do not remember that the local newspaper serves more than just expressing current news.  It also forever reflects how things were accomplished (or not accomplished), whose influence prevailed, and why a community developed the way it did. It illustrates in detail the feelings, judgments, reasons and influence of the community’s leaders, would-be leaders and its citizens.