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Columns

  • COLUMN: Voters expect, deserve explanations

    Monday night, the Spencer County Fiscal Court voted not to approve the sale of alcohol on Sundays, but those attending that meeting have no idea why.
    The issue was placed on the agenda several meetings ago by Magistrate Jerry Davis. One could assume because Davis brought up the issue, he was in favor of expanding the sale of alcoholic beverages to Sundays from 1 p.m. to midnight.
    So, it’s no surprise Davis made the motion to approve the ordinance.
    Magistrate Hobert Judd seconded the motion for the purpose of putting the issue out there for discussion.

  • COLUMN: With snow, school board made the right call

    In the three years I spent as the commanding officer of a Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit, my decisions had significant impact on all my stakeholders. One thing I got used to really quick was that almost every decision I made was subject to a Monday morning quarterbacking.

  • COLUMN: The Attorney General and high gas prices

    As I travel the state, I am frequently asked what I can do about high gas prices and price fluctuations across the Commonwealth.
     I understand the frustration with high gas prices. I understand how tough it is on hard-working families. No one wants to choose between filling up the gas tank or putting food on the table or paying a bill. And many of us rely on our vehicles to get to work, so that we can pay our bills. Be assured, protecting Kentucky consumers at the gas pumps is a top priority of mine.  

  • COLUMN: We’re near the end of April, but it’s not too late for some spring cleaning

    We are in the latter part of April, when all the big events are gearing up to put on a show. As of this issue, we have enjoyed the fireworks and flyovers of “Thunder Over Louisville,” and the shows will be ongoing until and including the Derby events.
    Later in the spring we will see many institutes of learning celebrate the graduation of our next group of leaders.

  • COLUMN: Sifting the trash – learning to ‘can it,’ not ‘toss it’

    I want to begin this article with an illustration of unity and cooperation to accomplish a goal.
    Saturday night (Sept. 24) was the Progressive Dinner as promoted and served by the business community of Main Street in Taylorsville.
    From start to finish, from beginning to end, all events went in perfect order. What we were served at each stop was delicious, be it appetizer to dessert. The hosts and hostesses and all involved were professional to the T.

  • COLUMN: Be mindful of workers on the road

    I stated last week that the Summer Roadside Litter Abatement Program will be the last week of June, and if all goes well, it will wrap up the first week of July, weather permitting.
    This means when we are on the roads, we need to watch for people helping clean up our roadsides. We have several crooked roads, and we have a lot of cars on the roads, so we all need to be on the watch for what is around the next curve.

  • COLUMN: Keeping it local, and doing it well

    If I’m going to do something, I want to excel at it.
    The reverse is also true: if I don’t pick up something easily, I’m likely to stop trying.
    I never learned how to ride a bike or whistle because it didn’t come easily right away. Occasionally I try whistling again, but I get frustrated and stop nearly as soon as I start.
    I also would rather play caddy for my husband when he plays disc golf than play myself because I’ve yet to master the game. How can I master it when I never play? Good question.

  • COLUMN: Rain delays spring cleaning

    We have seen more water hit the ground in the past five weeks than many people have ever seen. Water levels have risen to never before seen heights. The overflow at the lake was last seen with water pushed to the bridge.
    All this means that when the waters drop and the sun stays out to dry the ground, we are going to see people catching up on their normal spring activities, from gardening to fishing and boating.

  • GUEST COLUMN: Understanding early warning sirens

    The Spencer County Emergency Management Agency has nine outdoor warning sirens located throughout Spencer County. They are designed to inform residents who are outside of a possible emergency. The sirens activate simultaneously countywide during an emergency. The outdoor warning sirens are part of an emergency system designed to provide immediate and valuable information to citizens. The system is not designed to alert those who are within a home or other structure.
    What to do if the sirens
    are activated

  • COLUMN: April showers bring May showers?

    Taylorsville and Spencer County have seen their fair share of rain and floods over the past month and a half.
    This week’s rain made at least the third time in recent weeks that Brashears Creek has left its banks to cover the road and residents on Bowman Lane and West River Road have wondered if they’ll get flooded in – or stuck out – of their neighborhoods. And that’s just naming a few affected areas.
    If you’re anything like me, you’re probably sick of rain, sick of floods and on the verge of being sick of water in general.