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Matter of Opinion

  • A Bluegrass Bucket List

    My wife I just returned from a trip to Arizona where we took in the splendor of the Grand Canyon, among other interesting sites.
    The Grand Canyon is an awe-inspiring site and is probably one of the few things in this world that actually lives up to its hype.
    There’s a lot of diversity in Arizona, from the deserts in the south, to the more appealing (at least to me) northern portion that includes the red rocks of Sedona and the ponderosa pine forests of the canyon area.

  • Who won? Not your average Joe

    Somewhere in Kentucky, there’s a man named Joe struggling to feed his family. He’s been raised to believe in hard work and self-sufficiency, so he works overtime to make ends meet and avoids having to rely on government assistance. Sure, it makes life hard, but it does him proud to be able to look his family in the eye, and himself in the mirror.
    Unfortunately, Kentucky just made it harder on Joe.

  • Less debating, more discussing

    Newspapers, even ones in small towns like Taylorsville, are part of the world of mass communication. Mass communication basically refers to a system in which information is distributed to the masses, whether it’s by print, airwaves, or more recently, over the internet.
    Mass communications can be effective in getting the word out about news and events, but it can also lead to mass confusion, mass misunderstandings and mass manipulation.

  • Time to turn on the lights

    Fifty years after Major League Baseball began playing night games under bright lights, Chicago’s Wrigley Field slipped the switch and illumuniated their ivy-covered walls for night baseball.
    A lack of funds during WWII, then stubborness, tradition, red tape and other issues delayed night baseball at Wrigley until 1988.
    Some of those same issues plague efforts here locally to get lights for youth baseball at Ray Jewell Park.
    There’s a $39,000 grant available, but it must be matched by local funds, either from local government or private donations.

  • Tuning out Hollywood

    Hollywood celebrated itself Sunday night. They seemingly gather every other week during this time of year for some type of awards show to pat themselves on the back, lecture the common people about politics and values, and generally flaunt their money and looks for the drooling paparazzi.
    Decades ago, Hollywood made attempts to be classy. No doubt they still cornered the market on good looks and high salaries, but they seemed interested in celebrating good stories and good people.

  • God scares us more than guns

    Funerals are being held this week for many of the 17 victims in the most recent school shooting in Florida. Two graves are still fresh in Marshall County, KY and odds are, there could be another school shooting in the coming weeks, the next few months, or perhaps next year.
    Each one is a tragedy. And each time, before the smoke clears, the debate over guns rages. It’s the wrong debate.

  • One kind act at a time

    There’s a story often told of the little boy walking along the beach which has been cluttered with thousands of starfish washed up with the tide. A man watches as the little boy picks one up, and gently returns it to the ocean, then repeats it time and time again.
    “Young man, this beach is miles long and there’s no way you can make a difference for all these starfish before the tide rushes out,”

  • SBDM Councils are deserving of support

     

  • State considering $1 cigarette tax

    The chances for improving Kentucky’s health by reducing the state smoking rate through a $1 or more per pack cigarette tax increase are better than they’ve been in years, according to the Coalition for a Smoke-Free Tomorrow. Comprising nearly 150 health, business and advocacy organizations, the Coalition is advocating for the increase to prevent youth tobacco use and significantly reduce smoking in the Commonwealth, particularly among kids, teens, and pregnant women.

  • Who won? Not your average Joe

    Somewhere in Kentucky, there’s a man named Joe struggling to feed his family. He’s been raised to believe in hard work and self-sufficiency, so he works overtime to make ends meet and avoids having to rely on government assistance. Sure, it makes life hard, but it does him proud to be able to look his family in the eye, and himself in the mirror.
    Unfortunately, Kentucky just made it harder on Joe.