Matter of Opinion

  • Time to turn on the lights

    Fifty years after Major League Baseball began playing night games under bright lights, Chicago’s Wrigley Field slipped the switch and illumuniated their ivy-covered walls for night baseball.
    A lack of funds during WWII, then stubborness, tradition, red tape and other issues delayed night baseball at Wrigley until 1988.
    Some of those same issues plague efforts here locally to get lights for youth baseball at Ray Jewell Park.
    There’s a $39,000 grant available, but it must be matched by local funds, either from local government or private donations.

  • Tuning out Hollywood

    Hollywood celebrated itself Sunday night. They seemingly gather every other week during this time of year for some type of awards show to pat themselves on the back, lecture the common people about politics and values, and generally flaunt their money and looks for the drooling paparazzi.
    Decades ago, Hollywood made attempts to be classy. No doubt they still cornered the market on good looks and high salaries, but they seemed interested in celebrating good stories and good people.

  • God scares us more than guns

    Funerals are being held this week for many of the 17 victims in the most recent school shooting in Florida. Two graves are still fresh in Marshall County, KY and odds are, there could be another school shooting in the coming weeks, the next few months, or perhaps next year.
    Each one is a tragedy. And each time, before the smoke clears, the debate over guns rages. It’s the wrong debate.

  • One kind act at a time

    There’s a story often told of the little boy walking along the beach which has been cluttered with thousands of starfish washed up with the tide. A man watches as the little boy picks one up, and gently returns it to the ocean, then repeats it time and time again.
    “Young man, this beach is miles long and there’s no way you can make a difference for all these starfish before the tide rushes out,”

  • SBDM Councils are deserving of support


  • State considering $1 cigarette tax

    The chances for improving Kentucky’s health by reducing the state smoking rate through a $1 or more per pack cigarette tax increase are better than they’ve been in years, according to the Coalition for a Smoke-Free Tomorrow. Comprising nearly 150 health, business and advocacy organizations, the Coalition is advocating for the increase to prevent youth tobacco use and significantly reduce smoking in the Commonwealth, particularly among kids, teens, and pregnant women.

  • Let’s talk about school

    Should kids be forced to attend school?
    That’s a question raised by a local teacher in a video he posted to YouTube last week.
    The premise alone is controversial, but there were other aspects of Mark Hawkins’ 16 minute, self-recorded comments that raise concerns as well.

  • From shock to frenzy

    After the shock of Sunday morning’s massacre at a night club in Orlando began to wear off, the frenzy began.
    The frenzy was not about finding out what truly happened, but centered on who could make the most political hay out of the tragedy.

  • Ali vs. Rocky

    The Greatest!

    That’s the self-imposed title Muhammad Ali gave himself early in his career, and the same title most pundits have used to describe him over the past several days in the wake of his death Friday at the age of 74.

    Ali was indeed one of the greatest to ever step into the ring. He was pure showman, able to capture and keep an audience’s attention, and he introduced a fresh, new boastfulness into the world of sports. We can debate about whether that was good or bad, but Ali made it fun.

  • COLUMN: No fiddling with cell phones during government meetings

    While covering the Spencer County Fiscal Court Monday, I noticed something disturbing. A couple of magistrates intermittently appeared to be typing on their cell phones during the course of the meeting.

    Now in this day of constant information flow via text messages, Facebook and Twitter, and the unwillingness to separate from one’s cell phone at all, this may not seem like a big deal.

    But this was taking place during a public meeting — in which all communication involving public business is supposed to be available to the audience.