Today's Opinions

  • For those who served

    Saturday morning’s Veteran’s Day celebration in downtown Taylorsville was a meaningful reminder that the freedoms we enjoy in this nation did not come easily, and are not preserved cheaply.

    People enter military service for a variety of reasons. In years past, it often was involuntary, through a draft, and dutiful Americans stood up, put their lives on hold and served their nation when asked.

  • Pension system needs more accountability

    I can’t describe the emotion I felt when I learned of the state retirement system board’s decision to keep its current executive director, extend his contract for 30 months and award him a 25-percent raise – to $215,000 annually.

  • Foreign policy blunders threaten security

    Former President Jimmy Carter recently said of President Obama’s foreign policy that America’s “influence and prestige and respect in the world is probably lower than it was six or seven years ago,” adding “…I can’t think of many nations in the world where we have a better relationship now than when he took over.” Having recently returned from Israel, Jordan, Iraq, and Afghanistan with Congressman Andy Barr and several of my Senate colleagues, it’s clear that Carter’s critique is devastatingly accurate.

  • Honoring our vets

    “In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot.”- Mark Twain.

    As each of us rise each day to go to work or school, or on Sunday when we gather our family and worship in our church, I wonder if we think about what those simple freedoms we enjoy like being able to major in whatever career we chose, or the freedom to worship our Lord, what costs were paid for those freedoms.

  • Finding the right balance

    Twice last year, Spencer Countians who live near creeks and streams had to move to higher ground when heavy rains turned those waterways into raging rivers that caused property damage and even threatened lives.

    Twice, residents had to clean up, dry out and rebuild fences, driveways and other property damaged by the high water. It left many land owners wanting to take action to try to prevent future flooding.

  • Take part in the political process by voting Tuesday

    It’s hard to miss with the TV commercials, direct mailers and yard signs soliciting votes – but Kentucky is about to have a general election.

    The candidates, including those running for governor, have done their jobs. Now, it’s up to voters to do their jobs.

  • From our readers: Settlers Center potholes a pain

    This letter is written to the owners or operators of businesses in Settler’s Center.

    Settler’s Center is the primary place where we all do our business: Salt River Electric, Froman’s Drugs, Taco Bell, Subway, Hometown Pizza, Dollar General, Riley’s Barber Shop, CUB Bank, CountryMart and Radio Shack. This amounts to more than a thousand dollars each month.

  • From our readers: Why did Magistrates vote no on Tanglewood Drive?

    I believe a magistrate’s job is to listen to the members of his district, and address their concerns. The magistrate should be an advocate for the citizens he represents by answering their questions and supporting their needs. So I was very disappointed with Campbranch magistrate Collis Rogers when he made a motion that effectively killed the issue of Tanglewood Drive maintenance at the last Fiscal Court meeting.