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Today's Opinions

  • ONLINE-ONLY COLUMN: Our budget challenges

    There is good news and bad news for Kentucky as your General Assembly drafts a new biennial budget during this year’s legislative session. Let’s start with the good news: revenues are up.

    For the current fiscal year (FY12) revenue to the state from all general fund sources is up over $137 million from what we budgeted. The forecasting group also projects a modest increase in tax revenue over the next two-year budget period, assuming the tax structure remains as it is today. Let’s hope they’re right – on both counts.

  • LETTER: OWS protesters should leave camps, work in the system to get change

    There is little comparison of Occupy Wall Street to the Tea Party. The Tea Party group had gatherings on the street, but never stayed overnight or occupied anything. Its members often meet indoors to do their planning. They use contact with representatives to make changes and vote their minds to replace representatives. The Tea Party people work for a living and have no time to occupy anything but their homes and jobs.

  • COLUMN: Words of wisdom about saying no to drugs

    Normally, we don’t run things on this page without telling you who wrote them. Whether it’s from one of our staff members or from one of you, we usually put a name to it.
    But this week we are presented with a special situation.
    A loving mother came into our office and showed us what you are about to read below. It describes what a young man and his family went through during a time when his brother was on drugs. At the time it was written, the young man was an elementary student. Now, he is grown, but his mother thinks the words still need to be shared.

  • ONLINE-ONLY COLUMN: Sen. Hornback's Frankfort report

    The first week of the 2012 session was a combination of the ceremonial and the new. We gaveled in on Tuesday of last week with the traditional establishment of the membership of the Senate and approval of our chamber’s rules.
    Over 200 bills have already been filed in the General Assembly and will start making their way through the committee process beginning in earnest this week.

  • ONLINE-ONLY COLUMN: Redistricting, campaigns and term limits

    Following a national census, which takes place every 10 years in America, your General Assembly must redraw the lines that define legislative, senatorial and U.S. Congressional districts. We are doing that now, during this session.

    Lines are drawn based on revised population data, the goal being to end up with 100 state house districts, 38 state senate districts, and six U.S. congressional districts of roughly equivalent populations.

  • LETTER: Former sheriff’s indictment not a top story

    As one of your readers, I find it disturbing that you actually choose the indictment of former Sheriff Steve Coulter as [a top] news story for 2011.  This was a classic case of “making a mountain out of a mole hill.”
    Out of all the hype and efforts to discredit and intimidate a man who served his community with honesty and integrity, it all came down to him leaving office two days early.  Really? What a waste of tax dollars.

  • LETTER: No crime between midnight and 6 a.m.?

    Sheriff gets clean audit? I have heard that hot air before, dealing with many of the audits of our elected officials. The problem with audits is you only see what is given to you.
    Since taking office, Sheriff Stump has been escalating the cost to operate his department at a fast and furious pace. Recently, he requested new carpet and furniture for the sheriff’s office.
    Stump has even been charging taxpayers 50 cents per page of open record documents. Legally 10 cents is the price allowed by Kentucky Administrative Regulation 200 1:020 section 3.

  • COLUMN: New year, new challenges

    Welcome to 2012, the year of major changes.
    We will have the opportunity to recycle more items and begin a compost program to help downsize the amount of garbage landfilled.
    Mexico is leading a major change by closing what was known as the largest landfill in this hemisphere. It was pushing 1,000 acres in size. They increased the recycling effort from 6 percent to 60 percent in 10 years, so the reduced amount to be landfilled will be handled by smaller units.