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Today's Opinions

  • LETTER: Citizen wants questions answered

    Is the City of Taylorsville preparing to create yet another taxing bureaucracy? There is a storm water utility tax, mandated by an EPA regulation known as the MS4 program to control run off. Will this tax be applied to only city residents? Will county residents using city water be taxed? Will Mayor Don Pay ever stop his tax and spend agenda? Unlikely!

  • MATTER OF OPINION: Making a difference

    Congratulations to John Shircliffe for being named Citizen of the Year. The honor is well-deserved and, if I am going to be completely honest, somewhat overdue.

    I spent part of Thursday afternoon chatting with Shircliffe about the new plaque he received  from the Chamber of Commerce and the standing ovation he was given by members for his accomplishments. The memories were only minutes old and he still had a broad smile plastered across his face.

  • LETTER: Support Spencer County Bears

    Basketball season is at a feverous pitch for all basketball fans. We have those of us who like Cal”s CATS or Pitino’s CARDS or other teams we cheer for. I am going to offer and suggest Spencer Countians do something else.

    As our community continues to grow, it is also time we back and show support for Spencer County sports. Right now the Spencer County girls are in the middle of their season and we need to show support for them. They give their all in practice and in games, so let’s show support for them.

  • LETTER: People, not governments provide real help to needy

    As I was visiting a Shelby County church this past Sunday, the message of the week really hit home with me. You only have one life to live. What are you going to do with it? As you go through your life, will you “Make a Difference” in the lives of people around you?

    We are all aware of the earthquake in Haiti and the misery and suffering that these people are enduring and will continue to do for many, many years to come. Right now, it appears that the most pressing need is money to provide urgently needed relief supplies.

  • LETTER: Should we trust?

    Are we to trust a man with our future, sewers or otherwise, who can’t recall what he has done in the last six months and can look straight into a camera and say so. (Wasn’t there something about a Co-ed escort service as well?) Trust?

    I recall a lot of stories about those grant applications being written by a lot of people and I wonder how many were written by those taking credit.

    I bet the current economy has been on a lot of peoples minds when they think about looking at unemployment.

  • LETTER: A vote for change at cemetery

    Like many of you, I have family members in Valley Cemetery and over the past year I have watched a few board members of the corporation destroy the warmth and love some were trying to share.

    With little to no attempt to contact stockholders, they began on Fathers Day removing the flowers and items we left for our loved ones and throwing them in a pile like trash. Many items were broke or damaged beyond recognition.

    I watched as men and women tried to go through the items and locate the things they left for their loved ones.

  • Continuing the fight against fiscal irresponsiblity

    Guest columnist Congressman Brett Guthrie

    Kentuckians are ready for Congress to implement common-sense ideas that create jobs, make health care more affordable for everyone and keep our homeland safe.

    The American people deserve openness, transparency and accountability. Concerned citizens across the country continue to speak out against the majority’s plan to pass a government takeover of health care. Congressional leaders are meeting behind closed doors to draft their final plan for health care reform that will impact every American.

  • Stevens provides review of 2010 Legislative Session

    Guest columnist Rep. Kent Stevens

    Legislative sessions are much like snowflakes. They appear the same from a distance, but look closely and you’ll see each has a pattern all its own.

    Right now, the 2010 Regular Session that began in Frankfort Tuesday looks to the casual observer like most legislative sessions held in even-numbered years. It will last 60 legislative days. Its main purpose is to pass a state budget before a new two-year budget cycle begins in July. And legislative procedure will be the same, too.