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Features

  • One day missed in the vegetable garden can mean a big harvest, literally.  All of a sudden, or so it seems, your zucchini is the size of a torpedo and beans are bulging beneath the pod.  

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    Readifest and Health Fair is sponsored by the Family Resource Youth Services Center and the Spencer County Extention Office, and draws businesses, organizations and support from all areas of the county to help local students prepare for the upcoming school year.
     

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    The Spencer County Fair 4-H and FFA Hog Show was held on Saturday, July 15th.  Thank you to Kane Austin for serving as the judge for this show.  It is an honor for Mr. Austin to judge our county fair show because he is a world renowned judge.  Thank you to our sponsors of the livestock shows at the 2017 Spencer County Fair!

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  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency Acting Executive Director for Kentucky, Robert W. Finch, reminded farmers and ranchers that they have until Aug. 1, 2017, to nominate eligible candidates to serve on local FSA county committees.

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    Spencer County went to 4-H Star Wars Camp July 10th – July 14th.  Pictured you will see all of the campers, teens, adult volunteers, and staff that attended Lake Cumberland 4-H Camp with Spencer County.   A great week was had by all 111 that attended.  Spencer County will be going to camp in 2018, so if you are interested please contact the Extension Office for additional information next spring.

  • Summer’s heat and weather can take a toll on your flower garden. But with a little extra care, it is possible to bring it back to life for a few more weeks of vibrant color and texture.

    It’s always important to make sure annuals and perennials get plenty of water this time of year, especially in later summer.  Annuals, in particular, will start to decline without an adequate supply of water to keep the ground moist.

  • We cannot control the weather, but we can control what our tomatoes eat, so to speak. At planting time, we prepare the soil with composted hen manure and a little organic fertilizer; we also mulch around the plants immediately in order to moderate soil moisture and to prevent the spread of soil-borne diseases.   This year our work at building healthy soil has paid off because the tomatoes are thriving.  Some folks have not been as lucky as the rain poured down earlier in the season.

  • The Spencer County FFA Dairy Judging team representing the National FFA Organization placed second in the International Dairy Judging Contest held at the Royal Highland Show in Edinburgh, Scotland on June 26th.       This was a result of winning the National FFA competition last October.  Team members are John Brumley,  Max Dippel, Luke Williamson, and Michael Bentley. They were coached by Bland Baird.

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    A P S Forever Lady Sylvia won junior heifer calf champion at the 2017 All-American Angus Breeders’ Futurity Roll of Victory (ROV) Show, June 11 in Louisville. Anne Patton Schubert, Taylorsville, owns the winning heifer.

  • We gave up on the raspberries a couple of years ago, the fruit was so perishable and the plants lacked vigor.  We would cut the ‘Royalty’ raspberries all the way to the ground each year and forgo an early crop to manage disease, but it didn’t seem to pay off.  It was never a total loss, but about half the canes would be dried up and diseased by now.    

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  • You can prevent hay bale or barn fires if you bale hay at appropriate moistures and monitor the temperature of recently baled hay. Generally, hay will go through a heating phase within one to two weeks after baling. During this time, you should monitor the hay to make sure it doesn’t reach temperatures that can damage the hay or lead to spontaneous combustion.

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  • You know all the jokes about people having bumper crops of summer squash?  Squash shows up in people’s cars or in public spaces because there is so much that the gardener can’t even give it away.   I have a little bit of that problem this year and I give credit to the variety and the fact that it was plated later than usual.  I also planted loads of it!  Some, folks, however, may not be so blessed with a bumper crop.

  • Kentucky farmers may apply Sivanto Prime under a Section 18 Emergency Exemption to control the sugarcane aphid in sweet sorghum, Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles has announced.

    “Some sweet sorghum growers have reported a total crop loss because of this destructive pest,” Commissioner Quarles said. “Growers now can move forward with the certainty that this product will be available to protect their crops.”

  • Have you ever gotten blamed for something you haven’t done?  Most of us have experienced this and it is a dreadful feeling.  Well, there are a great many things we blame erroneously on one thing or another, and lichens are one of them. Lichens, often described as barnacles by worried gardeners, usually show up on woody plants after some sort of thinning or decline has occurred.  They are not the problem, only the result of a change in the plant’s environment.

  • If you are interested in exploring new cultures, you may want to consider participating in the Kentucky 4-H International Program. The program is looking for two individuals or families to host Japanese students for the next school year. The host does not have to have children living in the home to participate in the program.

    The Japanese students will arrive in August and stay with the hosts through May. While here, they will attend school and participate in extracurricular activities like an average American teenager.