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Features

  • Now is the time for young people and their parents to begin making plans for an annual summer ritual, 4-H Camp.

    KY 4-H camps are open to all Kentucky youth between the ages of 9 and 13. At 4-H Camp, young people learn independence and responsibility while having a lot of fun and making new friends.

  • I was catching up on some magazine reading the other day and on two occasions I read the phrase “choose thin spears” and I got so frustrated.  These spring articles were about asparagus, and I would like to go on the record that when it comes to homegrown asparagus (and even the wild growing in the fence rows), fat is good.  The fat spears have always been tender from the garden, so don’t let anyone fool you on the fresh from the garden variety. They are particularly well-suited for the charcoal grill.

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    A festive get-together for Easter

    Have you invited family or friends for brunch or dinner over the Easter weekend? This is the perfect opportunity to concoct some wonderful dishes, enjoy yourself and impress your guests. You can make sure the event is a roaring success by following these three suggestions.

    Invite spring into your home

  • The smell of fresh cut grass wafting through the neighborhood is one of the surest signs of spring. You should already be thinking about lawn care since it’s time to clip the grass for the first time. Your most important annual lawn duties begin with that first mowing.

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    Colton Todd, Ethan Thompson, Luke Jeffiers, Emily Truax, Valerie Pucko, and Lily Cook all participated in the 4-H Teen Summit at the Kentucky Leadership Center March 16th -18th.  

    They all took full advantage of the leadership classes that were offered. Liz Walker is on State Teen Council, was a group leader, and directed leadership classes.

    The 4-H Teen Summit provides young people with essential leadership skills that can help them mature into successful, community minded adults.  

  • I am feeling optimistic about our springtime weather and am as anxious as anyone to move some of my houseplants outdoors: my gardenia looks terrible in the dining room and the jasmine downstairs seems to stare into space dreaming of better days. Those days are coming, but just are slow about the transition from indoors to out.  

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    Make your voice heard about animal cruelty!

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    Horticulture enthusiasts, rejoice! It’s time to start planting the seeds of this summer’s garden. Tempted to start your own? Don’t worry: being a beginner doesn’t mean that you can’t do excellent work. Here are ten tips to help any gardening novice grow like a pro.

  • Got the time and the desire to learn something new? There are several people in the community offering their time and knowledge to teach fellow Spencer Countians on subjects ranging from art and crafts to cooking to lawn care.

    The Spencer County Cooperative Extension Service is once again offering classes through their S.O.S. Program. S.O.S. stands for Sharing Our Selves, with the understanding that virtually everyone has a skill, interest or hobby to share.

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    When Tom Scanlan and Debra Green met, Tom had 30 acres of farmland off of the Salt River, and Debra thought he should do something with it.

    Tom agreed. The pair discussed several options. They wanted to grow a unique crop that they and others would love.

    Finally, they settled on growing organic heirloom garlic.

    Five years ago, Salt River Garlic started with thirteen pounds of garlic. Now, they grow between three and five hundred pounds, around 25,000 plants. Each year, they grow roughly thirty different varieties.

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    Nathan Lawson of Big Springs Beef and Lawson Farms considers himself blessed to be a farmer and to share it with past and future generations.

    Lawson Farms started twelve years ago with thirty-two beef cattle that the family raised for their own consumption. They also grew corn, soybeans, alfalfa, wheat, and tobacco on their 800-acre farm. Then they started selling beef to friends, and Big Springs Beef grew from there.

    Now they have 140 cattle. This year, they decided to stop growing tobacco and to focus on raising beef.

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  • Mulch has become a landscape staple, almost to a fault when it is over applied, smothering roots and girdling trunks.  When done properly is can help to suppress weeds, retain moisture and moderate temperature.  These things can be achieved using a variety of materials but which type of mulch suits your needs best?

  • I do not worry about perfection in our lawn around the house.  It largely blends in to the pastures where we graze sheep and poultry.  However, we do need to spot seed from time to time to recover heavy use areas and around bale feeders.