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Features

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    The John Fitch Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution recently recognized winners of their Good Citizen Essay Contest.

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    A 2013 graduate of the University of Louisville has earned a prominent Fulbright Award to study journalism at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom. The competitive placement is awarded to only 3 percent of U.S. Fulbright applicants.

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    The Kentucky Center Governor’s School for the Arts is a three-week summer program for rising juniors and seniors in the state. Each spring, over 1,700 students audition for 223 spots for the program at Centre College in Danville.

  • Now is the time for young people and their parents to begin making plans for an annual summer ritual, 4-H camp.

    4-H camps are open to all Kentucky youth between the ages of 9 and 13. At 4-H camp, young people learn independence and responsibility while having a lot of fun and making new friends.

  • Mulch has become a landscape staple, almost to a fault when it is over applied, smothering roots and girdling trunks. When done properly it can help to suppress weeds, retain moisture and moderate temperature. These things can be achieved using a variety of materials, but which type of mulch suits your needs best?

  • Springtime brings warmer temperatures and more abundant rainfall, and it’s typically when many winged termites emerge inside homes and other structures. Termites swarm from their colony to disburse, fall to the ground, find mates and start new colonies in the soil.

    Through May, you might see swarms of winged termites, called swarmers, inside your home, signaling an infestation that can cause extensive and costly damage. Since swarmers are attracted to light, you often see them or their shed wings around windows, doors and light fixtures.

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    The Spencer County FFA held its 11th annual Ag Commodity Breakfast April 5 at Spencer County High School.

  • Last year our serviceberry was afflicted with a whimsical looking disease; the beautiful blue berries that appear in the summer looked like something from a Dr. Seuss book. In a good year the cedar wax wings usually flock in and eat the berries as they ripen – not so last year. The strange, white tubular protrusions that the berries were covered in not only looked funny, but they kept the birds away, too.

  • Now that the first week and a half of April have come and gone, many Kentucky farmers are still waiting for the right conditions to begin corn planting.

    “I think the far, far west of the state still has a little bit warmer climate than everybody else, but the majority of the state has barely gotten started with corn,” Chad Lee, a University of Kentucky extension agronomist, said last week.

    Recent cold temperatures could make uneven emergence more likely, according to Lee.

  • These students were recognized for their academic achievements for the third grading period at Spencer County Elementary School:

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    From over 400 entrees, kindergarten through 12th grade, only 20 were awarded prizes. Brittany Wiseman won first place in the 9th to 12th grade division, with Denham winning second place. Both students are sophomores in Brooke Mattingly’s (right) art class at Spencer County High School.

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    A group of Spencer County students participated in the 4-H Teen Summit at the Kentucky Leadership Center March 17 -19.

  • Sycamore Hill Farm of Taylorsville is a new member of the American Angus Association, reports Allen Moczygemba, CEO of the national breed organization headquartered in Saint Joseph, Missouri.

    The American Angus Association, with more than 25,000 active adult and junior members, is the largest beef breed association in the world. Its computerized records include detailed information on over 18 million registered Angus.

  • How much fertilizer do you really need to use on your lawn and garden? If you’re just making a guess, you could be using too much. But how can you know for sure? A simple and inexpensive soil test can tell you all you need to know to make your lawn and garden look great and to protect the environment from runoff of excess nutrients.

  • The magnolia family is diverse and April is the month that some of them begin to show their blooms in a most dramatic way. Among the native evergreen species are the southern magnolia (M. grandiflora) and the sweet bay magnolia (M. virginiana). The sweet bay magnolia has undoubtedly been over-used; I have seen them planted smack-dab against people’s homes on countless occasions. The southern magnolia, on the other hand, has a reputation for being marginally hardy here, so it may suffer from under planting. Selecting the right variety can solve the problem.

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    The 2016 Spencer County 4-H Communications Day was held Saturday, March 19 at the Spencer County Extension Office. It was a very successful morning filled with enjoyable demonstrations and speeches, good job interviews and great talent acts in the variety show. The following 4-H members participated, and if they were awarded first place, they will be going on the Area Communications Day April 23 in Henry County.

  • What can we do to impact the environment less? Be a green consumer. Walk or ride a bike, when you can; reuse things and if you can’t, at least recycle them. Buy less stuff that you don’t need. All are easily done, really.

    But what about in our gardens, as we struggle to keep things beautiful during the growing season?

  • The University of Louisville Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research has demonstrated a way to extract energy out of water vapor using the power of the sun, according to published research.

    There are potential implications not only for coastal regions with shortages of fresh water, such as California, but also for the Ohio River, said Andrew Marsh, assistant director of the Conn Center.

  • Thousands of volunteers with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s Adopt-a-Highway program will give the state's roadsides a “Spring Clean” during the first cleanup outing of 2016 from March 28 to April 3.