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Features

  • Millipedes are important recyclers that break down decaying plant matter as they feed. They accumulate in areas where there is moisture coupled with mulch, fallen leaves, or a significant thatch layer.

    During some times of the year, large numbers of millipedes can appear suddenly, covering sidewalks and sides of buildings. Reasons for this behavior are not clear, but the two main thoughts regarding this activity are that it may be due to:

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    Jacob Barnett dreams of researching new advances in agriculture. Rachel Sibert loves animals and would like to care for them as a veterinarian. Taylor Nash believes nothing would be better than teaching future generations about the science he loves — agriculture. All three of these young people will begin following those dreams with the scholarship help of the Louisville Ag Club.

  • There is nothing like a tropical plant for bold, bright blooms in your summer outdoor living space. It is the perfect environment because most tropicals like the bright light, heat and humidity that summer brings. We baby them through the winter months, waiting for the threat of frost to past so we can bring them outdoors for a breath of fresh, warm air.

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    Spencer County 4-H was well represented at the 2015 Teen Conference at the University of Kentucky June 8– 11. Owen Baxter, Ben Dippel, Becca Walker, and Liz Walker represented Spencer County. Mollie Tichenor, agent, and Emily Hume, summer intern, served as chaperones for the group.

    Congratulations to Madisyn Caudill and Lilli Hanik for getting recognized for receiving their Silver Honors Award.

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    The Spencer County FFA chapter recently participated in the FFA state convention in Lexington. The chapter was awarded numerous accolades, which will appear in The Spencer Magnet this and next week.

  • If your daffodils didn’t bloom well this year ask yourself these two questions: did you allow the foliage to die back naturally last summer before you cut it off; and has it been eons since they were last divided?

    Patience is a virtue when it comes to daffodils. Often the first color to appear in early spring, their beauty is long awaited. Then we have to wait another two months before we can remove the dulling green foliage. The foliage gathers nutrients for the bulb to store over winter, allowing it to grow and bloom next spring.

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    The end of another year of adventure is approaching for this year’s group of exchange students from EF High School Exchange Year. We, as host families, are sadly saying good-bye to these amazing teenagers we have gotten to know, and watched grow throughout the entire school year. Among this group is Carlota, a 16-year old Spanish girl who will be leaving us soon; going back home to Spain to try to explain to her friends and family about “the American way.” We hope she has some good things to say.

  • Dear Savvy Senior,

    Can you go over the different types of housing options available to seniors, and recommend some good resources for locating and choosing one? I need to find a place for my elderly mother, and could use some help.

    Searching Daughter

    Dear Searching,

    There’s a wide array of housing options available to seniors, but what’s appropriate for your mom will depend on her needs and financial situation. Here’s a rundown of the different levels of senior housing and some resources to help you search.

  • Canine influenza is on the move in the United States. A new strain of the flu has led to the death of eight dogs and sickened more than 1,700 in the Chicago area. Now dogs in other states including Wisconsin, Georgia, Texas, Ohio and Indiana are getting sick. Authorities are not yet sure if the strain of the virus is the same, but are urging awareness.

    University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Lab pathologist Lynne Cassone said there is no reason to panic, but dog owners should be vigilant.

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    The 2015 Louisville Area Communications Day was Saturday, May 9, at Cedar Grove Elementary School in Shepherdsville. I am so proud to say that everyone from Spencer County did an outstanding job.

    Junior Home Environment Demonstration: 1st Place and Blue Ribbon – Lorelae Cox demonstrated How to Make Towel Friends.

    Junior Safety Demonstration: 2nd Place and Blue Ribbon – Christopher Drury demonstrated How to Safely Haul Equipment.

    Speech Category: 2nd Place and Blue – Jackson Baird, Kentucky State Fair.

  • My interest in hardy geraniums started in about 1996. In European gardens they were as commonplace as phlox was in American perennial gardens. Twenty years later and hardy geraniums are available, in all their glory, at most garden centers. Experience has taught us which ones are suited to our warm summer climate.

  • Western Kentucky is centered amid one of the largest cicada emergences in more than 100 years.

    Experts studying this season’s crop of the periodic winged insects say two massive broods, or hatchings, are occurring simultaneously in the Midwestern U.S.

    The Mississippian and Kansan broods are now in the short-lived emergent and mass chorus stages of their lives, according to Dr. John Cooley of the Periodical Cicada Mapping Project.

    In Murray and other parts of the region, it comes as a rather noisy coincidence.

  • What a difference three weeks can make.

    As April came to an end, Kentucky farmers were almost a month behind in planting corn, with only 7 percent planted, well behind the same time last year (29 percent) and far below the five-year average (45 percent).

    But according to the latest report from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, 85 percent of corn in the Commonwealth has been planted, exceeding last year at the same time and the five-year average, both at 73 percent.

  • In 2010 I wrote “we should use more crape myrtles in Kentuckiana, they are not just for warm, temperate climes; in fact, there are a great many that go unbothered by an average winter in our parts.” Well, famous last words, right? I guess the operative words are “average winter!”

    Crape myrtles are one of the last of the summer blooming shrubs to break dormancy in the spring. In fact, many fear that their crape myrtles are dead because they are so slow to leaf out. But this year it just might be the case.

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    The 2015 Louisville Area Communications Day was Saturday, May 9, at Cedar Grove Elementary School in Shepherdsville.

    I am so proud to say that everyone from Spencer County did an outstanding job!

    Junior Home Environment Demonstration: 1st Place and Blue Ribbon – Lorelae Cox demonstrated How to Make Towel Friends.

    Junior Safety Demonstration: 2nd Place and Blue Ribbon – Christopher Drury demonstrated How to Safely Haul Equipment.

  • Dear Savvy Senior,

    What are the symptoms of a stroke? My 66-year-old aunt had a stroke a few months ago and neither she nor my uncle had a clue it was happening.

    Concerned Relative

    Dear Concerned,

  • Dear Savvy Senior,

    Do you know of any financial assistance programs or other resources that can help seniors with home improvement projects? I would like to help my 86-year-old father make a few modifications to his house so he can live there as long as possible, but money is very tight.

    Inquiring Daughter

  • It is strange but true — people often refer to shade as a problem. How many times have you heard of people desperately searching for that one magic thing they can do to get grass to grow underneath a pin oak? Why can’t we just accept the fact that it just isn’t possible and move on to better things?

  • Applicants for the 2015 Kentucky quota elk hunt may now go online to see if they were drawn.

    This year, 34,001 people from as far away as Hawaii submitted 70,348 applications for the hunt. Kentucky, which supports the biggest elk herd east of the Mississippi River, opened a season for elk in 2001.