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Features

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    The Spencer County Fair Dairy Goat Show was held July 20 at the fairgrounds. Luke Arthur of Cynthiana, KY, served as the judge for the show.

    In the Senior Showmanship class, Alissa Summers won first. She was also named Supreme Showman. Also participating in the class were Adam Light and Jordan Wildt.

    In Junior Showmanship, Justin Pietz placed first and was named Reserve Showman. Adam Pietz also participatied in the class.

    Alpine Champion: Alissa Summers – Class 1.

    Reserve Alpine: Alissa Summers – Class 3.

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  • As the new president of the Kentucky Association of County Agricultural Agents, I was honored to be in attendance when Dr. Murdock was recognized by our national association.  

    Over the past four decades, Lloyd Murdock, University of Kentucky extension soils specialist, has helped farmers across the state and region improve their operations. His efforts have not gone unnoticed.

  • Swallow Rail was the name my dad gave the farm over 30 years ago. He wanted it to be relevant, reflecting the spatial and natural qualities of his 18 acres in western Shelby County.  

    His inspiration came from the swallows that swoop and swerve so adeptly in open fields, catching insects on the fly. The rail of Swallow Rail comes from the two railroad tracks that flank either end of the road.  

  • The 2016 Kentucky 4-H State Communications Day was held on Saturday, July 9, at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.

  • We cannot control the weather, but we can control what our tomatoes eat, so to speak. At planting time, we prepare the soil with composted hen manure and a little organic fertilizer. We also mulch around the plants immediately in order to moderate soil moisture and to prevent the spread of soil-borne diseases.   This year, our work at building healthy soil has paid off because the tomatoes are thriving.  Some folks have not been as lucky  as the rain poured down earlier in the season.

  • Thanks to funding from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, the University of Kentucky Grains Center of Excellence will help advance Kentucky agriculture for decades.

    The board awarded the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment a $15 million grant on July 15 to renovate and expand the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton, with particular emphasis on grain crops and forages. The university must match the award.

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    The Spencer County Fair 4-H and FFA Hog Show was held on Saturday, July 16th.  Thank you to Warren Beeler for serving as the judge for this show.  It is an honor for Mr. Beeler to judge our county fair show because he is a world renowned judge.  

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  • We harvested some fantastic looking potatoes and garlic over the weekend. I am so excited about the garden this year, because it is performing so well.

    We need to wait a few more weeks on the onions, as we wait for their “tops to flop,” which allows them to store better.

    We have enjoyed some fresh green onion and bulbs, but for the bulk of the crop, we want to harvest and cure them properly so they will store well.

  • Honeybee populations have been declining in recent years, with a 40 percent loss of bees in some states last year, compared to a rate that hovered around 5 percent in the 1970s, state beekeeper Tammy Horn Potter said.

  • Summer months are the harvest season for blueberries and blackberries, both of which have the potential to grow very well in Kentucky.

    Harvest time for blueberries, which are native to North America, is from early June through early August. Blackberry harvest is from mid-June to early October.

    These delicious fruits offer several health benefits, and they capture the essence of summer in their sweetness.

  • This year the hydrangea display is proving to be spectacular.  It’s the big-leafed, or French hydrangea that elicit the most attention because of the volume and size of the blooms.  

    Hydrangea macrophylla got its common moniker because they were predominately cultivated in France, starting in the early 20th century. Hydrangea macrophylla prefer cool, moist and shady conditions, and the temperate climate in France proved favorable to the native Japanese species that was brought to the West.    

  • Powdery mildew is probably the most common garden fungus around.  It is not too terribly picky about where it spreads, it likes humid and dry weather, thrives in the heat of the summer and is hard to control once it has started.  The trick here is to prevent it from happening by proper plant selection, spacing and treatment before it takes hold.

  • Spencer County Clerk Lynn Hesselbrock is encouraging young women of Kentucky to apply for a scholarship and an opportunity to meet elected women from across the country. The National Foundation for Women Legislators and the National Rifle Association are co-sponsoring the 19th Annual NFWL/NRA Bill of Rights Essay Scholarship Contest for college-bound female high school juniors and seniors.

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    Spencer County 4-H’ers had a great time at the 2016 Teen Conference at the University of Kentucky June 13-16.

  • We have all asked the question: “Why hasn’t my plant bloomed?” Sometimes the answer is as simple as not enough sunlight, not old enough, not cold enough or hot enough, etc.  In fact, it could be as simple as a little digging and dividing for some renewed blooming attitude.

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