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Features

  • Powdery mildew is probably the most common garden fungus around.  It is not too terribly picky about where it spreads, it likes humid weather, thrives in the heat of the summer and is hard to control once it has started.  The trick here is to prevent it from happening by proper plant selection, spacing, pruning and treatment before it spreads.

  • As Co-Chairs of the Kentucky Legislative Sportsmen’s Caucus, we find it fitting to take a moment to extend an enormous debt of gratitude to our hunters and anglers. The critical contributions that these sportsmen and women make to our economy and professional fish and wildlife management in the Bluegrass State ensure that we will enjoy access to our hunting and angling traditions now and into the future.

  • There are some plants that demand good drainage:  taxus, coreopsis, gaillardia and penstemon, to name a few.  I have lost them all because they were poorly sited in the garden, but now that I know where water is slow to drain, I know where to plant those trees, shrubs and perennials that like wet environments.  There is an upside to poor drainage for some plants, just be sure that water is available when Mother Nature doesn’t deliver.

  • Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture Ryan Quarles is cautioning area farmers to stay alert for possible scams targeting hay buyers and sellers.

    “The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) has received several reports of fraudulent hay-buying activity in recent weeks,” Quarles said. “Farmers should take extra care to protect themselves from scam artists when buying or selling commodities such as hay or livestock, especially when contacted through email, social media, or text message.”

  • On Saturday, May 13, Spencer County 4-H Shooting Sports hosted the 9th Annual Spencer County Invitational Shooting Sports Tournament at the Spencer County Fish and Game Club.  This year more than 420 youth, ranging from 9-18, competed in this event, representing 18 counties.

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    Taylorsville Elementary School announced their students of the month for February. They are: Austin Coryell, Lucy Hinkle, Gavin Bowling, Michael Nethery, Yelismar Perez, John Hamon.

    Taylorsville Elementary School announced their students of the month for March. They are: Noah Goodlett, Jessie Sparrow, Jayden Cornett, Claire Ballard, Azriel Scally, Bryan Perez.

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    Brandon Taylor graduated in May 2017 from Bellarmine University with a Bachelor’s  Degree in Exercise Science and Minor in Psychology. He has  been  accepted into the Doctorate of Physical Therapy Program at  Bellarmine Grad  School. Brandon was 1 of 72 students chosen from over 900 applicants for this  program. He is a graduate of SCHS and the son of Paul and Nancy Taylor.

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  • I have patiently waited for some summer-like heat to arrive before planting my pepper and tomato plants.  Now that the forecast calls for warm spring nights, the coast is clear for summer vegetables!  Tomatoes love two things:  good drainage and heat.  If you have struggled with tomatoes in the past, consider what makes them most content when preparing the garden and setting your plants out.  

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    The family of Hobert and Edith Judd invite friends to join them as they celebrate the couple’s 60th Wedding Anniversary on Saturday, May 13 at 5 p.m. at First Baptist Church in Taylorsville. They request no gifts. RSVP Sherry Block at 502-773-4806.

  • The average age of farm operators in Kentucky is increasing, and over the next several years, many farm families will consider transitioning their farm to the next generation. The decision of when and how to begin the farm transition process can be difficult; often, farm families avoid the issue because it can be a difficult topic to discuss.

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    Anne Patton Schubert, Taylorsville, pictured left, and Sheldon Burks, Park City, right, won grand champion bull at the Kentucky Angus Sweepstakes and accepted their award at the 2017 Kentucky Angus Association Annual Meeting and Banquet last month in Louisville.

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    Five juniors from Spencer County High School were recently selected to participate in the 2017 Governor’s Scholars Program.

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  • A mild winter can have its downsides. One is that more ticks probably survived than normal. The result is more hungry ticks out earlier than usual, according to Lee Townsend, extension entomologist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

    Typically, warm weather brings ticks out of hiding to find the blood meal they need to continue their life cycle. In the past two weeks, Townsend has received calls about ticks on both people and pets.