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Features

  • 50 years ago
    March 8, 1962
    Miss Annette McClain, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Scott McClain, Route 1, Taylorsville, and Miss Berttye Sue Marattay, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Marattay, also of Route 1, have been named to the University of Kentucky Committee of 240.

  • Rainbow styled cakes are a fun current trend in cake decorating. The rainbow can either be colors in the cake layers or batter, or some kind of rainbow in the frosting. I saw a rainbow cake for the first time about two years ago. A college classmate posted a photo on Facebook of a cake she and her son made with plain white frosting and colored layers. It looked so amazing! A few months later, Family Fun magazine featured a cupcake that had a rainbow layered into the batter.

  • The name “Hitler” can strike fear, painful memories, even hatred especially with those of us who lived during that period when this man was doing all of the well-known, documented horrible deeds to humanity, especially the Jews, during his reign of terror masterminding at least 6,000,000 of them.

  • By JIM MILLER

    Dear Savvy Senior
    What tips can you recommend to help me save on my drug costs? I’m 62 years old, and currently take six different prescription medications that I can barely afford.
    Poorly Insured

    Dear Poorly,

  • 50 years ago
    March 1, 1962

    About 340 youth in Spencer County will observe National 4-H Week, March 3 to 10.
    Among the special activities in the county are window exhibits, posters, name tags, club meetings and newspaper articles.
    4-H Council
    The Spencer County 4-H Council guides the 4-H program. These men and women hold a regular meeting every month to make plans and organize committees to carry out various events and activities of 4-H youth.

  • 50 years ago
    Feb. 22, 1962

    Editor’s note: In 1962, The Spencer Magnet published on Thursdays.

    The Spencer County High School boys’ varsity basketball team beat the Lebanon Junction Bulldogs by a score of 64-59.
    The Bears hustled, and teamwork was exceptionally good. They had three men in double figures: Larry Hickman with 20, Bobby Coots with 15 and Charlie Stout with 10.

  • Dear Savvy Senior,

    Can you write a column on the shameful crime of elder abuse? I’ve worked for Adult Protective Services for many years, and it seems like this ongoing problem doesn’t get enough attention.
    Concerned Citizen

    Dear Concerned,

    I certainly can! Elder abuse is an immense and often hidden problem that all Americans need to be aware of so they can recognize it, and know what to do if they suspect a problem.

  • One of the earliest families to migrate to what became Spencer County was the Hills, who arrived in 1784.
    Capt. Hardy Hill and his wife Margaret (Wallace) may have been the first couple to sit down for dinner in what became Spencer County in 1824. Before then, they would have been having dinner in Shelby County.
    Prior to 1824, land north of the Salt River was in Shelby County and that south of the river was in Nelson.
    The Hills built their log cabins in 1784, some two miles west of Taylorsville on the Boston Branch of Salt River.

  • The scene was Boston.

  • This writer unveiled the only confirmed photo of Confederate Capt. William Clarke Quantrill several years ago.

  • This article is courtesy of the History of Kentucky by Lewis Collins and J.A. and U.P. James, published in 1847. It was reprinted by the Henry Clay Press, Lexington, Ky., in 1968.
    Of all that has been written about the frontiersmen of Kentucky, Daniel Boone undoubtedly became the popular favorite. Yet it was men like Bland Ballard, Simon Kenton and others who deserved more accolades than they received.

  • This article is courtesy of the History of Kentucky by Lewis Collins and J.A. and U.P. James, published in 1847. It was reprinted by the Henry Clay Press, Lexington, Ky., in 1968.
    Because so many Spencer Countians were once Shelby Countians before the division of Shelby in 1824, it seems quite appropriate to offer this biography. Remember, this was published in 1847. Because of its length, The Spencer Magnet is presenting the article in two parts. Make sure to check out next week’s edition for the second half of the story.

  • The results for the 2011 Gingerbread House contest, hosted by the Red Scooter, have been released. For the first time, we had co-winning mother and daughter entries.  Sheila Bramer is a repeat winner, and this year daughter Sarah Bramer was a winner with her first-ever gingerbread house.
    Another first this year was the entry of Halloween themed houses, although the judges were not nearly as fond of them as they were of the Christmas themes.

  • While many are mentioned in the scriptures as it relates to the story of the first Christmas, many were unaware of the impact of this event.

    The first of those who missed Christmas was quite obviously the innkeeper, although his name is not actually mentioned. In the hustle and bustle of his life, he missed it, although one would think that, of all those mentioned, he should not have missed it.

    Mary and Joseph must have come to the desk of the innkeeper, and the child was born in a stable because “there was no room for them in the inn.”

  • I love Christmas. With decorations and music and all the things to remind us whose birthday is being celebrated. It’s that time of year when we kick back in our recliners and flip on the game as the aroma of a freshly cut tree fills the house.

    Wish I had a recliner. I once had a recliner, but wore it out. Now, I’m just as comfortable sitting on a pillow in a straight back chair. But back to the important subject matter. It is time to celebrate the birth of our Lord and savior.

  • There were incidents during the American Civil War that helped independent thinkers take sides. Among such incidents were the Union executions of rebel prisoners in retaliation for the deaths of northern sympathizers.

  • After proof to the Kentucky Historical Society that Historical Marker 594 in front of the Spencer County Courthouse is wrong, the state has agreed to correct and replace it.

  • Spencer County’s Hilda Snider is one of the featured interviews in a book called “Tales From Kentucky’s One-Room School Teachers.”

  • The following cases were heard by Judge Linda Amrstrong July 1, 2011, in Spencer District Court:

    Traffic:
    Chase T. Downs (1993), failure to wear seatbelt, guilty, $25 fine; reckless driving, guilty, state traffic school and $143 court costs.

    David S. Figg (1987), failure to wear seatbelt, guilty, $25 fine.

    Antonio Gomez (1972), no operators/moped license, guilty, $50 fine and $143 court costs; violation of part 391 of federal safety regulations-qualification of drivers, $20 fine.