.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • One of the earliest families to migrate to what became Spencer County was the Hills, who arrived in 1784.
    Capt. Hardy Hill and his wife Margaret (Wallace) may have been the first couple to sit down for dinner in what became Spencer County in 1824. Before then, they would have been having dinner in Shelby County.
    Prior to 1824, land north of the Salt River was in Shelby County and that south of the river was in Nelson.
    The Hills built their log cabins in 1784, some two miles west of Taylorsville on the Boston Branch of Salt River.

  • The scene was Boston.

  • This writer unveiled the only confirmed photo of Confederate Capt. William Clarke Quantrill several years ago.

  • This article is courtesy of the History of Kentucky by Lewis Collins and J.A. and U.P. James, published in 1847. It was reprinted by the Henry Clay Press, Lexington, Ky., in 1968.
    Of all that has been written about the frontiersmen of Kentucky, Daniel Boone undoubtedly became the popular favorite. Yet it was men like Bland Ballard, Simon Kenton and others who deserved more accolades than they received.

  • This article is courtesy of the History of Kentucky by Lewis Collins and J.A. and U.P. James, published in 1847. It was reprinted by the Henry Clay Press, Lexington, Ky., in 1968.
    Because so many Spencer Countians were once Shelby Countians before the division of Shelby in 1824, it seems quite appropriate to offer this biography. Remember, this was published in 1847. Because of its length, The Spencer Magnet is presenting the article in two parts. Make sure to check out next week’s edition for the second half of the story.

  • The results for the 2011 Gingerbread House contest, hosted by the Red Scooter, have been released. For the first time, we had co-winning mother and daughter entries.  Sheila Bramer is a repeat winner, and this year daughter Sarah Bramer was a winner with her first-ever gingerbread house.
    Another first this year was the entry of Halloween themed houses, although the judges were not nearly as fond of them as they were of the Christmas themes.

  • While many are mentioned in the scriptures as it relates to the story of the first Christmas, many were unaware of the impact of this event.

    The first of those who missed Christmas was quite obviously the innkeeper, although his name is not actually mentioned. In the hustle and bustle of his life, he missed it, although one would think that, of all those mentioned, he should not have missed it.

    Mary and Joseph must have come to the desk of the innkeeper, and the child was born in a stable because “there was no room for them in the inn.”

  • I love Christmas. With decorations and music and all the things to remind us whose birthday is being celebrated. It’s that time of year when we kick back in our recliners and flip on the game as the aroma of a freshly cut tree fills the house.

    Wish I had a recliner. I once had a recliner, but wore it out. Now, I’m just as comfortable sitting on a pillow in a straight back chair. But back to the important subject matter. It is time to celebrate the birth of our Lord and savior.

  • There were incidents during the American Civil War that helped independent thinkers take sides. Among such incidents were the Union executions of rebel prisoners in retaliation for the deaths of northern sympathizers.

  • After proof to the Kentucky Historical Society that Historical Marker 594 in front of the Spencer County Courthouse is wrong, the state has agreed to correct and replace it.

  • Spencer County’s Hilda Snider is one of the featured interviews in a book called “Tales From Kentucky’s One-Room School Teachers.”

  • The following cases were heard by Judge Linda Amrstrong July 1, 2011, in Spencer District Court:

    Traffic:
    Chase T. Downs (1993), failure to wear seatbelt, guilty, $25 fine; reckless driving, guilty, state traffic school and $143 court costs.

    David S. Figg (1987), failure to wear seatbelt, guilty, $25 fine.

    Antonio Gomez (1972), no operators/moped license, guilty, $50 fine and $143 court costs; violation of part 391 of federal safety regulations-qualification of drivers, $20 fine.

  • Some people claim they’ve seen ghosts or heard unexplainable “bumps” in the night.

  • It has been some time since this column offered pictures of the village of Van Buren before it became the Taylorsville Lake bottom.

  • Past and present Spencer County residents have heard the name Curtis Ochs for a long time. The current Curtis has served off and on as county land surveyor for years. His father, also Curtis Ochs, held the same position.

  • It was a chore that produced anticipation.

  • When just a kid in Taylorsville, I often heard my father speak of the street names, but didn’t pay much attention to such rhetoric until I was much older.

  • It was historically known as the “Crutcher Tavern” and when it is fully restored, Taylorsville will have a restaurant to be called the “Polk House.” It will have the potential to rival famous historic Kentucky eateries.

  • Abraham Lincoln had a connection to Spencer County that few people know about and although it may seem slight, we’ll take it.

  • By Dr. JOHN LAPP, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

    Editor’s note: The Spencer Magnet welcomes columnist Dr. John Lapp to our regular list of contributing writers. Dr. Lapp has decades of experience as a professional psychologist and counselor.
    Well, how do we begin a new column in the Spencer Magnet? How about an introduction to some topics, beginning with this one: marriage.