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Features

  • Editor’s note: The following is a continuation of Tom Watson’s column last week, which looks at Spencer County family names and the history associated with them.

  • It’s not easy to find biographical sketches about Spencer County people and that’s why Perrin’s collection is so valuable. Here’s a look at some Spencer County families from “Kentucky: A History of the State.” Perrin, Battle & Kniffin, 6th ed.,1887, Spencer Co. References to the current time are to 1887.
    M.C. ALLOWAY was born in Nelson County Feb. 23, 1837, the second of a family of nine children born to Joel and Elizabeth (Grigsby) Alloway.

  • (–Based on the work of Byron Marshall of Minneapolis–)
    There is an unusual case of doctrinal interpretation regarding the marriage of a member of the Van Buren Church of Christ to her stepson.

  •  On a rise just north of Taylorsville, above the intersection of Yoder-Tipton Road and Kentucky 55-155 stands the Jacob Yoder home that was originally called “Beechland,” but was renamed “Vaucluse” by Yoder’s son-in-law, Frenchman David Roselle Poignand.

  • Recalls on food items, even baby food, seem to be happening with increasing frequency. It can be scary to see a report on the news, and realize that the item being recalled is in the pantry. It’s even worse if the item in question was just fed to the baby. One way to feel more secure about the safety of baby food is to make it at home.

  • By DR. DAN BENSION, Veterinarian
    Health has always been important. Recently, health care has pushed to focus on prevention to help avoid the limits of reactive medicine and care.

    It is much better to lead a life that will promote health and wellness, rather than live in a way that we know will harm our health and then attempt to fix the diseases that may result.

    This is sometimes not so obvious when it comes to our pets. The same rules apply to our furry companions with an even more important twist.

  • The buzzards roost on the roof, reflecting the eventual fate of the Wigginton House at Little Union.
    The house, just down the road from the Little Union Baptist Church in southern Spencer County, appears to have been built by Elijah and Anna (Riley) Wigginton around the time the county was formed.

  • Look no further than 210 W. Main St. to find three examples of community members who know the benefits of leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

    Tammy Butler, Dee Cox and Missy Verbeck work in the office of Verbeck and Kaleher and usually spend their lunch break taking in the sights of downtown Taylorsville by foot.

    The women have been taking their lunchtime walks on and off for a few years, and recognize the benefits of that almost daily physical activity.

  • It is one of Bloomfield’s more significant stories.
    It’s the intriguing tale of Jereboam Beauchamp and Ann Cook who are buried in each other’s arms in the Maple Grove Cemetery.

  • I’ve heard people talk about ghosts and other hobgoblins, but I’ve never seriously researched the subject. Twice in my life I have seen things that could not be easily explained. People tell me stories about images they’ve seen and sometimes try to link the sightings to an event in history, usually within their family.

  • Every year people who want to learn more about their family histories visit the office of the county clerk in Kentucky courthouses.

  • The Spencer County Historical and Genealogical  Society’s annual dinner will be held upstairs at the Sanctuary Art Center,  95 East Main Street, at 6:30 p.m. on March 28.

  • Editor’s note: The following is a continuation of local historian Tom Watson’s column on historical figures important to Spencer County. See last week’s edition of The Spencer Magnet for part one. Tom Watson also included the following note about last week's article: "Thanks to Charles Darnell for spotting a typo in the original article of March 9. John Speed was not a Confederate. It should have stated that he joined the Union service and was with Sherman's Army during the march to the sea."

  • Editor’s note: Check out next week’s Spencer Magnet for a continuation of this article.
    Over the years, several people have made names for themselves in this area, both before 1824 when Spencer County was formed, and since that year. The Speed family and its  connection with Spencer County is mentioned in “ Lawyers and Lawmakers of Kentucky,” by H. Levin, editor, 1897. It was published by Lewis Publishing Company of Chicago and reprinted by the Southern Historical Press.

  • Family Resource Center, located inside Spencer County Elementary School, helps families in need of clothing, food, affordable housing, paying bills and other necessities that can stand in the way of their children’s education.

  • Editor’s note: As the Spencer County Relay for Life approaches, the paper is going to be featuring submissions from local relayers. They are going to share their stories of why they have decided to participate in the annual Relay for Life.

    Every Relay For Life participant has their reasons to Relay.  I would like to share with you “my” reason I have chosen to Relay.  My name is Christy Weed.  I am the captain of the new Relay For Life team, Hotsy-Totsy.  

  • Taylorsville Elementary School has a program uniquely designed for volunteers to give back to the community in a big way. The mentoring program allows community members to interact with and make a difference in the lives of children who need help with their social development, behavioral issues or other problems.

  • Valentine’s Day can celebrate all kinds of love, not just the romantic kind. It is just a few days away, but there is still time to make plans for making the day special. These are just a few of the ways that Spencer County moms remind their families of their love.

    “We always get a heart shaped pizza,” said Terri Cooper, mother of five. They get their specialty pizza from Bearno’s Pizza.

  • Aprons and Ideas Homemaker Club held a homemade candy exchange for their February meeting. A candy exchange, much like a cookie exchange, lets participants sample and share multiple recipes. The candy can then be given as gifts or kept to serve to guests or eaten by the family.