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Features

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    Taylorsville Elementary School’s great students for the month of September were: , from back row: left to right, Alexis Barrick, Chloe Chesser, Mary Beth Taylor, Noah Frank, and front row, Mackenzie Baldwin and Brennan Guzman.

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    On October 27th SCES welcomed Spencer County’s own, Laura Jones, center, who is the current Miss Kentucky. Jones went on to be in the top 12 of the Miss America competition. She now travels the state to share the importance of a healthy lifestyle.

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    On October 13th SCES celebrated their students during Toss It Thursday.  After participating in various activities, many students were recognized for scoring Proficient or Distinguished on KPREP.

  • Thousands of bats lie, heaped high on cave floors, sometimes as many as 10,000 at one site. Fragile, winged mammals that have succumbed to the ravages of white nose syndrome and dropped, flightless, from their roosts on cave ceilings. Biologists report coming upon this tragic scene and finding, among the piles of tiny corpses, living bats, struggling to survive hibernation by burrowing among the bodies of their colony for residual warmth.

  • There are certain trees that consistently remain my favorites.  When I think about their common characteristics, one thing stands out: the bark.  Interesting bark is always there, whether the tree is leafing out, blooming, or showing dramatic fall color.  Bark remains constant whether the tree is good, bad, pretty or ugly.  

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    Spencer County Middle School students got a break from the books on Friday as they celebrated the school’s recent test scores that once again earned them a “Distinguished” designation. The students gathered in the gym for a celebration, followed by a concert and a dance that made for a much more relaxed afternoon. They call the event Grizzly Fest and it recognizes the classroom achievements. One teacher described it as an Academic Pep Rally.

  • I don’t just rely on fall color to tell me the seasons are about to change; there are so many other little things to observe that help me make the transition.  Gossamer webs floating in the air, the long shadows of a sun falling slowly in the southern sky, walnuts hidden in the grass, and robins flocking in search of crabapples and other fall fruit.   

  • Kentuckians interested in participating in the industrial hemp research pilot program in 2017 are invited to submit an application with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

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    Justin Pietz, Adam Pietz, Ryan Tobbe and Jackson Tobbe showed their poultry at the Kentucky State Fair. Best American went to Justin Pietz. Best English went to Adam Pietz. Best Clean Legged Single Comb went to Ryan Tobbe.

    Makala Hatzman participated in the 2016 Kentucky State Fair 4-H/FFA Heifer Show. She showed her heifers and participated in showmanship at the State Fair.

  • Hands down this is the best time of the year for me.  The weather has a subtlety about it with extremes thrown in here and there as a reminder that Mother Nature will do as she pleases.  I am tired from the summer but reinvigorated when the light changes and the blue sky becomes clearer.  I can think about gardening again with a smile on my face.  

  • Following are the names of Spencer County youth who earned honors at the State Fair in the Cloverville Exhibit Hall:

    4-H Arts and Crafts

    Junior Original Design Ceramics – Jillian Dunning – White

    Junior Ceramics – Lorelae Cox – Blue

    Junior Folk Art – Joshua Sims – Blue

    Junior Weaving – Kennedy Catlett – Red

    Junior Jewelry Beadwork – Kennedy Catlett – White

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    Congratulations to the 2016 Spencer County MVP, Most Valuable Peer, Recipients:  Allie Roberts, Stephanie Keener, Sierra Knapper, Alyssa Howie, Amber Hahn, Kelly Herndon, Connor Foster, Joshua Dunkelberger, Navy Adam Davis, Jaden Cannon, Deven Cannon, Shianne Bonham, Kelly Baird, and Marissa Allen.

  • Fall harvest season is a busy time for Kentucky farmers and their families. It also is a peak season for agricultural injuries and an especially important time for farm families to pay attention to safety.

    Take time to talk to workers about safety. You need to be sure all workers are trained and physically capable of operating equipment and that they understand the safety procedures.

  • Some plants are prolific; some are not.  Dandelion seed floats through the air and disperses far and wide in spring or summer; hundreds of tiny seeds burst from the spent blooms of cleome as a sphinx moth feeds at dusk.   Woody plants can be a bit more elusive.  I have never seen a Serbian spruce spring forth from a fallen cone nor an apple tree emerge from rotten fruit beneath its canopy.  Starting woody plants from seed can be tricky.     

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  • It seems that, once again, we (meaning the collective gardening public) have disregarded the imperative known as diversity…it applies to more than the plant world, too.

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    Taylorsville Elementary School Principal Steve Rucker insists on teaching TES students patriotism, as he leads the school in the pledge and the singing of the National Anthem each day during the morning assembly. Recently, he mentioned to PTO President Christie Struck that he wished the school had a larger flag than the smaller one that hung in the corner of the gym.