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Features

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    Spencer County 4-H’ers had a great time at the 2016 Teen Conference at the University of Kentucky June 13-16.

  • We have all asked the question: “Why hasn’t my plant bloomed?” Sometimes the answer is as simple as not enough sunlight, not old enough, not cold enough or hot enough, etc.  In fact, it could be as simple as a little digging and dividing for some renewed blooming attitude.

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    Cattle owned by Anne Patton Schubert of Taylorsville won awards June 10 at the 2016 Kentucky Angus Association Preview Show in Louisville.

  • The intestinal tracts of all mammals have various types of bacteria as part of their natural intestinal microflora. There are many opportunities for young children to be exposed to these bacteria, such as pets, friends, etc. Our state’s most recent salmonella outbreak is a harsh reminder of this, as many of the victims are children.

  • We have spent over 10 years improving our vegetable garden by adding composted horse manure, composted sheep manure and composted chicken manure at the end of each season. The result is a seriously well-drained plot that has the capacity to retain moisture and slowly feed what we plant. I am so looking forward to the vegetable garden this year, because last year was such a disappointment.

  • Gov. Matt Bevin, along with Kentucky commissioner of agriculture Ryan Quarles, proclaimed May as Beef Month in Kentucky, citing beef’s nutritional benefits and its impact on Kentucky’s economy. They were joined by Kentucky Beef Council chairman Steve Dunning, Beef Council president David Lemaster, Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association executive vice president Dave Maples, Kentucky Beef Council director of consumer affairs Kiah Twisselman, and the Governor’s Office of Agriculture Policy executive director Warren Beeler.

  • VBS at First Baptist of Taylorsville

  • The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) is in discussions with Western Kentucky University and the University of Kentucky to study the viability of hops production in the Commonwealth, Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said.

  • Once again, we enjoyed sweet potatoes all winter long from a fantastic harvest last fall. I planted out about 25 organic slips in Shepherdsville in late May, and by early November we had four nursery crates full of one of nature’s perfect foods. Seven months and counting in storage with no spoilage is impressive. We are down to about a dozen sweet potatoes; just in time for a transition to other summer vegetables.

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    In a year or two, expect to find Marianne Gaddie teaching high school agriculture, or perhaps working as an extension agent.

    The 2013 Spencer County High School graduate is working this summer as an intern at the Spencer County Cooperative Extension Office. She started May 16, and she’ll be putting in 40- to 60-hour weeks all summer.

    This fall, Gaddie will be a senior at Morehead State University, where she’s an agriculture education major.

  • University of Kentucky entomologists recently developed a website that will have the most up-to-date information on the Zika virus and its spread, as mosquito populations around the state begin to build. The website is http://pest.ca.uky.edu/EXT/ZIKA/1kyzika.html.

  • I have no complaints about plant performance this spring. But, it seems, some gardeners are still stumped by their under-performing plants. Why plants fail to thrive is a hard question to answer, of course, because a great many things factor into poor performance, lack of bloom or die back.

  • The most common form of plant propagation is digging and dividing, which is best done in early spring before new growth, or in the fall before plants go dormant. Digging and dividing is great for herbaceous plants, but those plants that are considered woody ornamentals do not divide as easily with a spade. In this case, we can look to the technique of rooting out softwood cuttings from the mother plant.

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    The Commonwealth Honors Academy (CHA) is an exciting, challenging three-week academic, social and personal growth program for outstanding high school students who have completed their junior year. Students will be selected from the Commonwealth and surrounding region. Upon completion of the Academy, students will:

    • receive six hours of university credit

    • have the opportunity to take three hours of tuition-free university courses at Murray State University during the subsequent fall and spring semesters

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    Sarah Tipton, of Spencer County, and a junior at Cornerstone Christian Academy in Shelbyville, was recently selected as a Governor’s Scholar.

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    The local Relay for Life event is a month away, but students at Spencer County Elementary School got an early start on the Cancer Awareness event on Friday with a Mini-Relay that raised over $2,500 and also resulted in collecting over 2,000 food items for the Backpack Buddies program. Donna Lawson, who organized the event, said this is the third year the local students have participated. Later in the afternoon, students at SCMS held a similar event.

  • “Tomato 101” is for beginners and advanced gardeners alike. There are many assumptions about the tomato that get passed on by the most well-meaning aficionado. I take my tomatoes seriously and have developed a routine to hedge my bets for a healthy summer harvest.