.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Dear Spencer County Families:

    It is with great pride and excitement that I write this letter of introduction to you as the newly appointed Principal of Spencer County Elementary School. I am honored to have the opportunity to lead a school with such a rich tradition that has produced so many outstanding students.

  • Welcome Back Tigers!

    Buses are fired up, hallways are waxed and teachers are preparing classrooms.  Why?  Because we are excited about a new school year!  

  • On behalf of our Spencer County Middle School faculty and staff, I’d like to welcome everyone to the 2016-2017 school year.  I pray that each of you have had a blessed summer.  

  • Welcome back to school Spencer County High School Bears.

  • Dear Parents and Guardians,

    I hope everyone has had a safe and restful summer. I am taking this opportunity to address some important health related issues for this upcoming school year.

    Chronic Health Conditions

  •  

  •  

    The restart of school means a fleet of buses back on the roads. With plenty of narrow, winding roads to travel, being a bus driver in Spencer County requires a particular attention to safety.

    For all the other drivers, sharing the road with the buses also takes caution.

  • Now that we have completed the projects of summer, experienced vacation memories with family, and enjoyed simple pleasures such as basking beside a pool or fishing from the lake, I would like to take this opportunity to welcome you back to another exciting year of teaching and learning in Spencer County Schools.

    Teachers are busy organizing classrooms and planning lessons, while administrators are addressing last-minute preparations in eager anticipation of receiving children on August 10th.  

  •  

    School starts back in Spencer County next week, and students, parents and grandparents packed the Spencer County High School Saturday morning for the annual Health Fair and ReadiFest.

    Whether they were experienced students who were gearing up for their final year of high school, or youngsters just getting ready to begin their journey, there was an air of excitement that accompanies fresh starts.

    Students lined up to get free school supplies, get various health exams and gear up for the coming school year that starts on August 10.

  • Have you wondered about your family history? Is there an ancestor you resemble, or whose character traits you share? Do you wish you knew more about your ancestors? This series will explore resources to help in your search. Learning more about your ancestors is a way to honor them – without you, your ancestors are history.

  •  

  •  

  •  

    The Spencer County Fair Dairy Goat Show was held July 20 at the fairgrounds. Luke Arthur of Cynthiana, KY, served as the judge for the show.

    In the Senior Showmanship class, Alissa Summers won first. She was also named Supreme Showman. Also participating in the class were Adam Light and Jordan Wildt.

    In Junior Showmanship, Justin Pietz placed first and was named Reserve Showman. Adam Pietz also participatied in the class.

    Alpine Champion: Alissa Summers – Class 1.

    Reserve Alpine: Alissa Summers – Class 3.

  •  

  •  

  • As the new president of the Kentucky Association of County Agricultural Agents, I was honored to be in attendance when Dr. Murdock was recognized by our national association.  

    Over the past four decades, Lloyd Murdock, University of Kentucky extension soils specialist, has helped farmers across the state and region improve their operations. His efforts have not gone unnoticed.

  • Swallow Rail was the name my dad gave the farm over 30 years ago. He wanted it to be relevant, reflecting the spatial and natural qualities of his 18 acres in western Shelby County.  

    His inspiration came from the swallows that swoop and swerve so adeptly in open fields, catching insects on the fly. The rail of Swallow Rail comes from the two railroad tracks that flank either end of the road.  

  • The 2016 Kentucky 4-H State Communications Day was held on Saturday, July 9, at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.

  • We cannot control the weather, but we can control what our tomatoes eat, so to speak. At planting time, we prepare the soil with composted hen manure and a little organic fertilizer. We also mulch around the plants immediately in order to moderate soil moisture and to prevent the spread of soil-borne diseases.   This year, our work at building healthy soil has paid off because the tomatoes are thriving.  Some folks have not been as lucky  as the rain poured down earlier in the season.

  • Thanks to funding from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, the University of Kentucky Grains Center of Excellence will help advance Kentucky agriculture for decades.

    The board awarded the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment a $15 million grant on July 15 to renovate and expand the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton, with particular emphasis on grain crops and forages. The university must match the award.