• In 2010 I wrote “we should use more crape myrtles in Kentuckiana, they are not just for warm, temperate climes; in fact, there are a great many that go unbothered by an average winter in our parts.” Well, famous last words, right? I guess the operative words are “average winter!”

    Crape myrtles are one of the last of the summer blooming shrubs to break dormancy in the spring. In fact, many fear that their crape myrtles are dead because they are so slow to leaf out. But this year it just might be the case.


    The 2015 Louisville Area Communications Day was Saturday, May 9, at Cedar Grove Elementary School in Shepherdsville.

    I am so proud to say that everyone from Spencer County did an outstanding job!

    Junior Home Environment Demonstration: 1st Place and Blue Ribbon – Lorelae Cox demonstrated How to Make Towel Friends.

    Junior Safety Demonstration: 2nd Place and Blue Ribbon – Christopher Drury demonstrated How to Safely Haul Equipment.

  • Dear Savvy Senior,

    What are the symptoms of a stroke? My 66-year-old aunt had a stroke a few months ago and neither she nor my uncle had a clue it was happening.

    Concerned Relative

    Dear Concerned,

  • Dear Savvy Senior,

    Do you know of any financial assistance programs or other resources that can help seniors with home improvement projects? I would like to help my 86-year-old father make a few modifications to his house so he can live there as long as possible, but money is very tight.

    Inquiring Daughter

  • It is strange but true — people often refer to shade as a problem. How many times have you heard of people desperately searching for that one magic thing they can do to get grass to grow underneath a pin oak? Why can’t we just accept the fact that it just isn’t possible and move on to better things?

  • Applicants for the 2015 Kentucky quota elk hunt may now go online to see if they were drawn.

    This year, 34,001 people from as far away as Hawaii submitted 70,348 applications for the hunt. Kentucky, which supports the biggest elk herd east of the Mississippi River, opened a season for elk in 2001.

  • Summer is almost here. We’ve already experienced some heat, just a taste of what’s to come. Humans aren’t the only ones who suffer when the temperatures rise. Farm animals feel it, too. You can recognize when your livestock may be in danger from the heat and what you can do to increase their comfort.

    Livestock become uncomfortable when the heat index reaches about 90 degrees. The heat index is a combination of air temperature and humidity, and is used to describe how it feels outside.


    The newest face at the Spencer County Cooperative Extension Office is a familiar one.

    Emily Hume, a senior majoring in animal science at Murray State University, has joined the Extension staff as a summer intern.

    Hume is a Spencer County native and spent much of her time as a youth in the county’s 4-H programs. This summer will mark her eighth year showing pigs, though it will be her first in the open divisions.

  • Spencer County’s Noah Williamson was one of 61 students, representing 37 counties from across Kentucky who were recognized during The Gatton Academy’s eighth graduation ceremony in Van Meter Hall last Saturday.

    Gatton Academy Executive Director Dr. Julia Roberts expressed that the graduation ceremony was a celebration for the entire Commonwealth.

  • COLUMBUS, Ohio – Emily Hume, Taylorsville, Ky., recently received a $1,000 United Producers Inc. Scholarship.

    Hume, the daughter of David and Tonya Hume, currently attends Murray State University studying animal science.

  • The following students enrolled at the Shelby County Area Technology Center have received the Citizen of the Month for April which is a student whose behavior and attitude distinguish them as superior students.

    James Abell – Automotive Technology

    Trever Mckinnley – Industrial Maintenance

  • Spencer County resident Doug McCoy will be certified as a master environmental educator at a ceremony in Frankfort today.

    A total of 20 environmental educators from across the Commonwealth will be recognized. All master environmental educators have completed the state’s rigorous Professional Environmental Educator Certification (PEEC) course and at least six subsequent years of continuing education. The course is offered by the Kentucky Environmental Education Council (KEEC), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet.


    Workers from Waldridge Restoration have been applying a fresh coat of paint and making repairs to the Hall-Taylor Funeral Home in downtown Taylorsville. One of the oldest buildings in Spencer County, a historical marker indicates it was constructed in 1838 and is currently one of the centerpieces of downtown.


    Several businesses with Spencer County locations were included in the 2015 Best Places to Work in Kentucky list, compiled by the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and the Kentucky Society for Human Resource Management.

    Signature HealthCare was listed fourth among medium-sized companies. They operate the nursing home in Taylorsville, with over 150 employees.


    On Wednesday, May 6, the Spencer County-Taylorsville Chamber of Commerce welcomed Hosparus with an official ribbon cutting ceremony. Hosparus is a fully accredited nonprofit hospice care organization that provides medical care, family counseling, pain management and more to anyone with a life-limiting illness, and their family, regardless of their ability to pay. Hosparus cares for patients in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, inpatient units or in hospitals in Spencer and surrounding counties.

  • The USDA Food and Nutrition Service joined Kentucky state agencies for agriculture and Market-LinkTM to host Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) merchant sign-up events in Louisville, Manchester and Morehead.

    American consumers are enjoying ever more opportunities to buy food directly from their local farmers, and state and federal agriculture departments are working together to increase SNAP recipients’ access to farmers’ fresh products.


    In an agriculturally-diverse state like Kentucky, knowing everything there is to know about the Commonwealth’s farm production can be difficult — without a copy of the “Kentucky Agriculture Facts” booklet. The second edition of Kentucky Farm Bureau’s pocket-sized guide to state agriculture facts is available online with updated statistics.


    Once again we enjoyed sweet potatoes all winter long from a fantastic harvest last fall.

    I planted about 25 organic slips purchased from Country Corner Greenhouse in Shepherdsville in late May and by early November we had four nursery crates full of one of nature’s perfect foods. Seven months and counting in storage with no spoilage is impressive. We are down to about a dozen sweet potatoes; just in time for a transition to other summer vegetables.


    Marissa Allen has been chosen to represent Spencer County High School for Rising Scholars for sophomore students. She will be invited to an exclusive event at the University of Kentucky this summer, and will receive additional unique opportunities, mailings and information from UK over the next few years of high school. Allen was selected based on the following criteria: strength of record, potential for academic success, demonstration of leadership, community service and contribution to diversity.


    Members of the Spencer County Elementary School Chorus and Percussion clubs performed at the Trills and Thrills music festival on Saturday. The festival is a part of the music events hosted by Kentucky Kingdom. The students received superior ratings from each of the judges, which is the highest rating possible. The judges commented on the great quality of their tone and recognized all of the students for their hard work. After performing, the students got to spend the afternoon enjoying the rides at Kentucky Kingdom.