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Features

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    The rules on amending soil have changed over the years. Part of the change relates to the fact that good soil is hard to come by in new developments where enormous earth moving equipment is used to level trees and land. This equipment not only removes valuable topsoil, it also compacts the subsoil and kills much of the living organisms that make up a healthy soil system. The less we disturb the soil the better, but for many the reality is bleak so some sort of amendment is necessary in order to improve tilth, drainage and nutrition for our plants.

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    The Kentucky state veterinarian’s office is monitoring the avian influenza outbreak in poultry flocks in southern Indiana to protect Kentucky’s $1 billion poultry and egg industry.

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    One day earlier in December, I came home to find a string of small colorful bags attached to my living room door frame. It was quickly explained to me that we would be celebrating Advent with my German exchange student by opening up one bag a day and enjoying small delectable goodies like marzipan, German chocolate or gingerbread cookies.

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    Deborah Lewis was nominated by Spencer County High School faculty for her determination and participation in extra-curriculars such as softball, and leadership amongst her peers. She is a great student, always positive and a hard worker.

  • Even though it’s winter, it’s not too early to start thinking about summer camp or summer jobs. 4-H has a way to combine both. All 4-H camps are now hiring staff for the summer.

    Many opportunities for rewarding summer jobs have recently been posted on the University of Kentucky employment website.

    All staff members are required to be trained and certified in first aid and CPR prior to the beginning of camp staff training in May, before they can be employed by the 4-H camping program.

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    A veteran Spencer County cattle farmer has earned a statewide honor for his agriculture leadership.

    Jim Naive, 85, was inducted into the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Hall of Fame at the association’s annual convention in Owensboro, Ky.

    “It’s rather humbling to me,” Naive said in an interview this week. “I’m not sure that I’m that deserving. But when I found out about it, I was very proud to be a part of it.”

  • The three most important things you can do to protect livestock in cold weather are providing sufficient water, giving ample high-quality feed and offering weather protection. Cold stress reduces livestock productivity, including rate of gain, milk production and reproductive difficulty, and can cause disease problems.

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    Elementary students from Spencer County Elementary School and Taylorsville Elementary School who achieved Distinguished scores on recent testing, were recognized recently during a Spencer County High School basketball game. Superintendent Chuck Adams invited the students and their parents to the schools to be recognized, and the students were brought out onto the floor between games in front of a packed house.

  • Spencer County Elementary School announced their 2nd semester honor roll recently.

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    Spencer County High School Choir participants are making a change for the better. The first year Ms. Kelsie Shipley, SCHS Choir Director, sent kids to audition in 2013 for the KMEA All-State  Choir, no students from SCHS made it.  Competing against students all around the state for these spots is not an easy task.  

    Last school year, 2014-2015, Ms. Shipley had three students make it; Shelby Hughes, Halee Hood, and Patrick Sweazy.  This year, 2015-2016, Ms. Shipley had six students make the KMEA All-State Choir. 

  • What better way to deal with the winter weather than to enjoy a hearty bowl of soup?

    One of my favorite soup options is a simple Great Northern bean soup. It makes a delicious meal all by itself and is especially good when served with fresh hot corncakes.

  • It seems the fall season lasted just into January 2016. The ferns that hang from lamp posts in Old Louisville finally got zapped by a freeze just after the New Year. Winter jasmine is in bloom, among other late winter bloomers, and a few spring flowering trees have broken bud. Our current cooldown is welcome just to slow things down a bit.

  • Every time you bring a load of firewood inside this winter, you may be opening the door for wood-infesting insects to make your home their home. Most insects brought into the home on firewood are harmless, but you can greatly reduce their numbers by following a few simple steps.

  • On an unusually warm December morning, farmers Allen Phillips and Eddie Klingenfus stand before the remains of a once booming dairy farm and reminisce about their lifetime of labor.

    Combined, the two farmers gave Shelby County nearly a century’s worth of milk–Phillips with 53 years under his belt and Klingenfus, 42.

    But the two say they are finally ready for a break.

    “A dairy ties you down,” Klingenfus said, explaining that a farm is like caring for an infant child that never grows up.

  • Dear Savvy Senior,

    Is pill splitting safe? I have several friends who cut their pills in half in order to save money, but I have some concerns. What can you tell me?

    Cautious Kim

    Dear Kim,

    Pill splitting – literally cutting them in half – has become a popular way to save on pharmaceutical costs but you need to talk to your doctor or pharmacist first, because not all pills can be split.

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    A pound of butter, a pound of sugar, a pound of flour and a pound of eggs—that’s the easy-to-remember recipe for an 18th-century pound cake, large enough to feed a family for days. Most of us don’t have large families to feed, and with the short days and long nights of January, we may be inclined to polish off the entire cake by ourselves.

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    The Spencer County FFA Farm Toy Show was held December 11-12 and attracted more than 1700 attendees for the weekend. The show featured over 50 vendors and 180 tables of items.

    One of the highlights of the show was the farmscape exhibits and judging. This year, the John S. Shouse Memorial Award, which is given to the top farmscape, was presented to Jesse Smith, Matthew Benedict, and Jake Graves from Springfield.

  • Every couple of years I like to revisit my father’s favorite Christmas poem inspired by Clement Moore’s famous work, ‘Night Before Christmas’. The writer is unknown, but he or she certainly was a gardener; and you may even get some last minute gift ideas from its verse.