• On Sunday, Nov. 14, we went to a Russel Ray Fryman Day at Cynthiana. Russell Ray is one of our lay mission team members. What an inspiration he is. He would bring his guitar and sing, and he would get so happy he would preach a little too.

    My favorite song he would sing was, “I Feel Good.”

    The chorus went like this: “I feel good just to know I’ve been redeemed. It makes me feel good.”

  • Methodist church to have candlelight service

    Taylorsville United Methodist Church, 415 W. Main, will host the annual Community Christmas Eve Candlelight Service on Friday, Dec. 24 at 11 p.m. Everyone is invited to attend and celebrate the birth of Christ.

    Risen Lord to host Advent worship services Dec. 15

    Risen Lord Lutheran church will be having special Advent worship services Dec. 15. The worship service will be at 7 p.m. preceeded by a soup supper at 6 p.m.

  • Each year, I like to pass along the following tips and information about the most popular plant of the holiday season, the poinsettia.

    Traditional red and green colors are well represented in the flowers available for the holidays. Poinsettias, the most popular and spectacular holiday flowers, can combine both these colors.

  • Every year during Christmastime it is a family tradition of ours to set up the nativity scene and read from the Gospels the details concerning the birth of Christ. While most of the figurines in our nativity are easily understood, the wise men have a curiousness of mystery. There are many uncertain beliefs about who they were and why they came to visit; after all, the Bible does not say anything else about these men who traveled afar to visit the manger. So who were these magi and where did they come from?

  • You’ve all heard the song, “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year.”  And I must admit, I generally agree.  But there are times when the hustle and bustle of the Christmas season turns me into a bit of a Grinch. 

    What about you? 

  • The majority of Mary Trice’s nativity scenes are in her living room and dining room common area. Her dining room has a tall Christmas tree that she calls her silver, white and gold tree. This tree includes her nativity ornaments and other ornaments that hold special meaning, such as the rose ornament she bought in memory of her father.

  • It is a long-standing Christmas tradition to have lots of home-baked cookies in the house. Whether due to a fear of unexpected company in need of dessert or a desire to give treats to the neighbors, many of us feel the need to bake several varieties of cookies during the holiday season. It can be time consuming to bake dozens of cookies from multiple recipes, regardless of how much fun it may be.

  • A few Sunday’s ago I preached about the straight gate.

    Matthew 7:13-15: “Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it. Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.”

  • When it rained it poured in March 1909. The Salt River water shed and Brashears Creek went on a rampage, helping the river to stretch out of her banks. Taylorsville suffered a major flood during which an act of heroism by a man named Miller was not overlooked by the Andrew Carnigie Hero Fund.

    We quote the late Fred Prewitt from a recording of a local historical society meeting several years ago. Fred said his father was sick in bed at Taylorsville when the flood struck.

    The family lived near the intersection of Garrard and Main Cross Streets.

  • Jan Milby hosted an open house of her new quilt studio, Quilting @ Fashion and Flowers, on Sunday, Nov. 14. She retired in September after thirty-five years of being a hairdresser. For the last thirteen years, Milby had her own shop on the side of her home, which is located at 888 Mudd Lane in Finchville. When she retired, she decided to move her quilting hobby out of her spare bedroom and into her shop.

  • Editor’s note: This article is the third in a three-part series featuring the stops on the 2010 Christmas Home Tour, sponsored by the Taylorsville Main Street Committee and hosted by The Red Scooter. Tickets are $15 each and can be purchased by visiting The Red Scooter at 32 East Main or by calling 502-477-6608.

    Stops on the Saturday tour will include four local residences, a church and two businesses.

    The tour runs from 3 p.m. until 8 p.m.

  • Can you believe that December is already here? In just a few short days this year will be over and we will be starting 2011. How did that happen? Where did the last year go?

    I guess it went to elections and homecomings; it went by in birthdays and in anniversaries; there were a few weddings and way too many funerals. Day by day the year ticks off, and now with Christmas upon us, we are looking forward to a new year. But for a minute, I want us to look back.

  • Picking out the perfect Christmas tree is serious business for me. Some may find it a trivial chore but I want a tree that will be worth the effort of cleaning, moving furniture, hauling boxes, lights, step ladders and more. But once the mundane is done, then the fun begins. Each ornament that adorns the tree has a story to tell about my grandparents, parents or me. The tree is indeed important because it holds the past. And it must hold the past, in the form of many beloved ornaments, securely and with style.

  • Every winter we look forward to the pleasures of warming our hands and feet by a blazing fire, mesmerized by the dancing flames.

    When buying firewood two factors will determine just how hot your fire is—seasoning and the kind of wood.

    Wood is made up of air and cellulose (wood fiber). The more air space that wood has, the less there is to burn. Buying wood with the heaviest/densest per unit volume will keep you toasty.

    Osage orange, hickory, black locust, all of the oaks, sugar maple and ash produce hot fires; plus they are easy to split.

  • Traditions are what make holidays so memorable and fun. Thanksgiving traditions involving family recipes and favorite activities like taking a long walk after dinner or all day card game sessions make the holiday even more meaningful. There is always room for a new tradition to come along that reinforces the meaning of the Thanksgiving.

  • Thanksgiving is just a few days away. The holiday season is about to kick off for real, but before that happens, I just want to stop for a minute and say thanks to a generous and supportive community.

    This past Sunday night was the Ministerial Association’s annual Thanksgiving Service.

    It was probably the best attended service we have had in several years.

    I want to thank Pastor Johnny Hood and Grace Chapel for sharing their church and their talents with us.

  • Jesse and Frank James did a considerable amount of their hiding in northeast Nelson County around Chaplin and in the Samuels-Deatsville section not far from Bardstown. The area was friendly territory for the soldiers of fortune where families named Dawson, Samuels, Sayers, Pence and Hall provided food and lodging.

    The Tom and Nancy Dawson log house still stands where Confederate Guerrilla Captain William Quantrill wrote love poems to Nancy Dawson, their granddaughter.

  • Even if we cook a small turkey or have lots of guest, there always seems to be a lot of turkey left over after Thanksgiving. I love turkey sandwiches, but there are only so many I can eat. My solution for using up our leftover turkey is tortilla soup. I found the recipe twelve years ago in Southern Living magazine, and I adapted the recipe to use leftovers.

    The original recipe called for chicken instead of turkey. The year I found the recipe, my mother had smoked the holiday turkey and thought the leftovers would be excellent in tortilla soup.

  • Did you know that the cranberry used to be called the “craneberry?” When the colonists first learned of this berry from their American Indian hosts in the New World they thought the blooms of the native shrub looked like the long neck and bill of the crane. Eventually, as language goes, it was shortened to cranberry.