.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • The most common form of plant propagation is digging and dividing, which is best done in early spring before new growth, or in the fall before plants go dormant. Digging and dividing is great for herbaceous plants, but those plants that are considered woody ornamentals do not divide as easily with a spade. In this case, we can look to the technique of rooting out softwood cuttings from the mother plant.

  •  

    The Commonwealth Honors Academy (CHA) is an exciting, challenging three-week academic, social and personal growth program for outstanding high school students who have completed their junior year. Students will be selected from the Commonwealth and surrounding region. Upon completion of the Academy, students will:

    • receive six hours of university credit

    • have the opportunity to take three hours of tuition-free university courses at Murray State University during the subsequent fall and spring semesters

  •  

    Sarah Tipton, of Spencer County, and a junior at Cornerstone Christian Academy in Shelbyville, was recently selected as a Governor’s Scholar.

  •  

  •  

    The local Relay for Life event is a month away, but students at Spencer County Elementary School got an early start on the Cancer Awareness event on Friday with a Mini-Relay that raised over $2,500 and also resulted in collecting over 2,000 food items for the Backpack Buddies program. Donna Lawson, who organized the event, said this is the third year the local students have participated. Later in the afternoon, students at SCMS held a similar event.

  • “Tomato 101” is for beginners and advanced gardeners alike. There are many assumptions about the tomato that get passed on by the most well-meaning aficionado. I take my tomatoes seriously and have developed a routine to hedge my bets for a healthy summer harvest.

  • Now that we are in May, it is a good time to think about pest control for your home vegetable garden.

    You can control pest problems, and perhaps prevent future difficulties, in your garden by doing some advance planning and following a few simple Integrated Pest Management practices. IPM promotes minimal pesticide use and emphasizes the use of all available pest control methods including cultural, mechanical and biological practices to prevent pest problems.

  •  

    Ryan Bivens of Hodgenville may not have started his career on a family farm, but farming has been in his blood since high school. Bivens is a graduate of Spencer County High School.

    The 37-year-old and Misty, his wife of 14 years, are first-generation farmers.

    “My farming career started as an FFA project,” Bivens said.

    As a sophomore, he raised 34 acres of soybeans.

    “It’s blossomed and took off from there,” he said.

  •  

    Five SCHS students were recently selected to be part of the Governor’s Scholars Program for outstanding juniors this summer. Michael Bently, Lilli Hanik, Zach Martin, Marissa Allen and Austin Cunningham are among the over 1,000 Kentucky students who will benefit from the challenging academic work for five weeks. Students are sent to one of five college campuses across the state where they will join students from across the Commonwealth.

    The program’s mission is to enhance Kentucky’s next generation of civic and economic leaders.

  •  

    The John Fitch Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution recently recognized winners of their Good Citizen Essay Contest.

  •  

    A 2013 graduate of the University of Louisville has earned a prominent Fulbright Award to study journalism at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom. The competitive placement is awarded to only 3 percent of U.S. Fulbright applicants.

  •  

    The Kentucky Center Governor’s School for the Arts is a three-week summer program for rising juniors and seniors in the state. Each spring, over 1,700 students audition for 223 spots for the program at Centre College in Danville.

  • Now is the time for young people and their parents to begin making plans for an annual summer ritual, 4-H camp.

    4-H camps are open to all Kentucky youth between the ages of 9 and 13. At 4-H camp, young people learn independence and responsibility while having a lot of fun and making new friends.

  • Mulch has become a landscape staple, almost to a fault when it is over applied, smothering roots and girdling trunks. When done properly it can help to suppress weeds, retain moisture and moderate temperature. These things can be achieved using a variety of materials, but which type of mulch suits your needs best?

  • Springtime brings warmer temperatures and more abundant rainfall, and it’s typically when many winged termites emerge inside homes and other structures. Termites swarm from their colony to disburse, fall to the ground, find mates and start new colonies in the soil.

    Through May, you might see swarms of winged termites, called swarmers, inside your home, signaling an infestation that can cause extensive and costly damage. Since swarmers are attracted to light, you often see them or their shed wings around windows, doors and light fixtures.

  •  

    The Spencer County FFA held its 11th annual Ag Commodity Breakfast April 5 at Spencer County High School.

  • Last year our serviceberry was afflicted with a whimsical looking disease; the beautiful blue berries that appear in the summer looked like something from a Dr. Seuss book. In a good year the cedar wax wings usually flock in and eat the berries as they ripen – not so last year. The strange, white tubular protrusions that the berries were covered in not only looked funny, but they kept the birds away, too.

  • Now that the first week and a half of April have come and gone, many Kentucky farmers are still waiting for the right conditions to begin corn planting.

    “I think the far, far west of the state still has a little bit warmer climate than everybody else, but the majority of the state has barely gotten started with corn,” Chad Lee, a University of Kentucky extension agronomist, said last week.

    Recent cold temperatures could make uneven emergence more likely, according to Lee.