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Features

  • The wet/dry vote in Spencer County was a big talk around town over the past few months; and who could blame us?  The vote to make the county wet (or keep it dry) was one of the biggest controversies in the recent history of our region. 

  • James Elmo Casey was known as a cheerful man.

    Casey, a native of the Mount Eden area, died Thursday in Whitley County less than two months after his 102nd birthday party.

    “He was always cheerful,” said his grandson Barry Casey of Mercer County.

    Barry Casey said he remembers his grandfather as always joking around and pulling tricks on the children. He and his brothers and sister, Lyndon Casey, Jeffrey Casey and Sibyl Stricklin, would spend time on the farm near Mount Eden where their grandfather was a lifetime farmer.

  • The following Spencer County High School students obtained perfect attendance for the first nine weeks of school.

    9th grade

  • Chapter 7

    My harmonica had to be here somewhere. I had it before we arrived at the tent. It was raining cats and wiener dogs! I should have worn my raincoat, but I didn’t know I would be gone so long.

    Oh no!  I hadn’t told my family I was leaving.

    When I realized I’d dropped my harmonica, I thought I could walk outside the tent and find it. I had meandered off in the pouring rain without telling anyone. I was in trouble – in more ways than one!

  • Cancer awareness

    The Spencer County Extension Office will be holding a Lunch and Learn program tomorrow, from noon until 1 p.m. to raise awareness about cervical and breast cancer, for women in the community. The program is free. Please call the Spencer County Extension Office to sign up at 477-2217.

    Halloween fun at the library

    On Friday dress like your favorite book character and visit the Spencer County Library.  Tell a staff member or have them guess which character you are to win a prize.   

    Cody Goodlett benefit

  • I preached a sermon on the fifth chapter of James about the rich men taking advantage of the poor men and what was waiting for those who did this. When we had dismissed the congregation, one of our members said, “When I grew up, we lived in a place that was well kept and a lot of people would gather in and have parties. But all up and down the valley where we lived were poor people that lived in shacks or anywhere they could. I have heard people say that Jesus will have a place separate in heaven for us from this poor trash, where we won’t have to congregate with them.

  • Pumpkins have been on sale for weeks, children have obsessed over their costumes and somewhere in the middle of it all is the story of All Hallow’s Eve.  

    Halloween, as it is known today, has its origins in something a bit more interesting than just pumpkin carving and candy collecting.  In fact, the evening’s festivities marked the beginning of winter for the ancient Celtic race of the Druids. 

  • Trunk or Treat at Risen Lord Lutheran

    Risen Lord Lutheran church would like to invite you to Trunk or Treat from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m. Friday. There will be trophies for best costumes, an inflatable and food. The church is located at 5138 Taylorsville Road near the Elk Creek Grocery/Restaurant. Call 502-477-6557 for information.

    Harvest Festival at Parkland Hills Baptist

  • Taylorsville Elementary is hosting a Title I family night Thursday from 4:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. There will be a CATS celebration, balloon toss and cook out from 4:30-5:30. Bring a chair if you would like to sit outside to eat and to watch the balloon toss.

    There will be family math, reading and science games indoors, along with story telling and a pumpkin decoration contest from 5:30 p.m. until 7 p.m.

    Pumpkins will be on display in the library with ribbons of achievement. Students have been asked to decorate a pumpkin like their favorite book character.

  • ROBIN BASS/The Spencer Magnet

  • Spencer Magnet reader Lynn Noel sent in these photographs of one healthy chrysanthemum owned by Ted and Betty Goodlett of Bloomfield.

    Noel said that the five-inch pot mum was purchased in the spring and later transplanted under this flag pole.

    “It seems to have found new life,” said Noel. “I pray that our service men and our country find new life under her too.”

     

  • Sure, the Mount Eden woman’s book is filled with fascinating facts about chimpanzees, surprising specifics about kangaroos and pleasant pictures of pooches -- and even portraits of pigs. But Paula Sparrow’s Kentucky Living’s Creature Comforts is more than 147 pages highlighting the state’s animal sanctuaries.

    Just ask Teresa Bottom, founder of Lifebridge for Animals, an organization in Shelbyville dedicated to cutting down on pet overpopulation.

  • Community Baby Shower

    If you are pregnant, or have a child under one year old, you are invited to attend the 5th annual community baby shower at the Spencer County Extension office and at the Spencer County Health Department Friday from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. with a special presentation, baby gifts and prizes from 1 p.m. until 2:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

    Spencer County Historical and

    Genealogical

    Society

  • CHAPTER 6

  • Family night at TES

  • ROBIN BASS/The Spencer Magnet

    All Saints Catholic Church had a special delivery Tuesday morning when a new steeple was delivered. Plans are to erect the structure this morning after the arrival of a crane. The church’s original steeple was damaged as a tornado swept through the area in Feb. 2008.

  • Plum Creek Baptist Church chili supper & Gospel concert

    There will be a chili supper and Gospel concert  at 5 p.m. Friday at Plum Creek Baptist Church.  For more information, please call the church office, 502-477-2582. Plum Creek Baptist Church is located at the corner of Highway 44 & Plum Creek Road in Waterford. 

    Old Gospel Barn Special Singing 

    The Old Gospel Barn, located at 11286 Louisville Road (Hwy 31E), Cox’s Creek, will be having a gospel sing Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

  • Some two dozen high schoolers stood in neat rows beside the football field. No fidgeting, no comic grins.

    They’ve been coming out for the new JROTC program since August, and they know the drill. Clad in white t-shirts and black shorts, the students break rank only on command to begin laps around the track.

    Science teacher and Army Reserve 1st Lt. Robert Naylor joined the cadets on the run. When he started the program, teachers told him the kids wouldn’t last.

  • The odd thing about living in the country is that squirrels are rarely the nuisance they can be to urban folk. I think country squirrels are wilder than city ones, but it also turns out that we are experiencing two different squirrel species all together. 

    Acorns, walnuts, chestnuts and hickories certainly qualify as a worthwhile winter stash for a squirrel, but they also sustain themselves on other fruiting bodies like plums, paw-paws, serviceberries, holly berries, mulberries, crabapples, elderberries and the fruit from dogwoods and black gums.

  • Exodus 20:8-11 – Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: But the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.