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Features

  • The Waterford area of Spencer County has been populated for many years, dating back to the Mississippian native Americans who found life along the Salt River particularly good. There were animals to hunt through the use of spears and later the bow and arrow as hunting methods advanced into the woodland period.

  • During the Civil War, Taylorsville native Jack Allen fought for the South and rose in rank to colonel.

  • With the Spencer County Fair opening July 15, it seems a glance back at some classic photos of the fair decades ago is appropriate.

  • One local reader submitted these old receipts for subscriptions to The Spencer Courier and to The Spencer Magnet. The Spencer Courier receipt, pictured above, dates back 100 years.

  • In 1983, this scribe wrote a series of columns on one of the men of Confederate guerrilla leader William Clarke Quantrill and his infatuation with a young Spencer County girl.

  • The late Emma Wilson Brown said that old John Purdy could be heard before he was seen on the streets of Bloomfield, tapping his cane and bellowing with his strong voice.
    It wasn’t unusual for him to stop on a corner and let loose with a rebel yell.

  • The Beard family and related lines have been around Spencer and Nelson counties for a mighty long time. In The Terre Haute (Indiana) Morning Star, Oct. 17, 1904, there appeared a tribute to John L. Beard, 80, and his wife Judith Frances Wells, 75, who had been married for 56 years.
    In a copy of the newspaper appears a picture of the couple, but because of the age of the paper, the photograph is not very sharp. The couple lived in Vigo County, Ind.

  • It is said that people who seem obsessed with history live with their minds in the past. I am happy to report that I have just a passing interest in the subject and really don’t care how old everything is, who lived where and when and if their great grandparents had a pet chimp. But I wonder what the chimp’s name was?
    My uncle Gilbert had a parrot that cursed, but that’s another story.

  • Editor’s note: The following is a continuation of Tom Watson’s column last week, which looks at Spencer County family names and the history associated with them.

  • It’s not easy to find biographical sketches about Spencer County people and that’s why Perrin’s collection is so valuable. Here’s a look at some Spencer County families from “Kentucky: A History of the State.” Perrin, Battle & Kniffin, 6th ed.,1887, Spencer Co. References to the current time are to 1887.
    M.C. ALLOWAY was born in Nelson County Feb. 23, 1837, the second of a family of nine children born to Joel and Elizabeth (Grigsby) Alloway.

  • (–Based on the work of Byron Marshall of Minneapolis–)
    There is an unusual case of doctrinal interpretation regarding the marriage of a member of the Van Buren Church of Christ to her stepson.

  •  On a rise just north of Taylorsville, above the intersection of Yoder-Tipton Road and Kentucky 55-155 stands the Jacob Yoder home that was originally called “Beechland,” but was renamed “Vaucluse” by Yoder’s son-in-law, Frenchman David Roselle Poignand.

  • Recalls on food items, even baby food, seem to be happening with increasing frequency. It can be scary to see a report on the news, and realize that the item being recalled is in the pantry. It’s even worse if the item in question was just fed to the baby. One way to feel more secure about the safety of baby food is to make it at home.

  • By DR. DAN BENSION, Veterinarian
    Health has always been important. Recently, health care has pushed to focus on prevention to help avoid the limits of reactive medicine and care.

    It is much better to lead a life that will promote health and wellness, rather than live in a way that we know will harm our health and then attempt to fix the diseases that may result.

    This is sometimes not so obvious when it comes to our pets. The same rules apply to our furry companions with an even more important twist.

  • The buzzards roost on the roof, reflecting the eventual fate of the Wigginton House at Little Union.
    The house, just down the road from the Little Union Baptist Church in southern Spencer County, appears to have been built by Elijah and Anna (Riley) Wigginton around the time the county was formed.

  • Look no further than 210 W. Main St. to find three examples of community members who know the benefits of leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

    Tammy Butler, Dee Cox and Missy Verbeck work in the office of Verbeck and Kaleher and usually spend their lunch break taking in the sights of downtown Taylorsville by foot.

    The women have been taking their lunchtime walks on and off for a few years, and recognize the benefits of that almost daily physical activity.

  • It is one of Bloomfield’s more significant stories.
    It’s the intriguing tale of Jereboam Beauchamp and Ann Cook who are buried in each other’s arms in the Maple Grove Cemetery.

  • I’ve heard people talk about ghosts and other hobgoblins, but I’ve never seriously researched the subject. Twice in my life I have seen things that could not be easily explained. People tell me stories about images they’ve seen and sometimes try to link the sightings to an event in history, usually within their family.

  • Every year people who want to learn more about their family histories visit the office of the county clerk in Kentucky courthouses.