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Features

  • As harvest season gets underway across Kentucky, there is an increased likelihood that drivers will more frequently encounter slow-moving farm equipment on the roadways. The staff of Kentucky Farm Bureau (KFB) urges motorists to slow down, stay alert and patiently share the road this fall, especially in recognition of National Farm Safety & Health Week, September 20-26.

  • May is the month of peonies, so why am I writing about them now? Well, October is the ideal time to plant, replant, move, or divide your peonies. Whatever the case may be, you want to do it now so that the roots can re-establish themselves before the ground freezes.

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    As September begins, farmers across the state are preparing to harvest what could be a record corn crop.

    “I think we’re in good shape to be near record for corn, although I’ve seen a lot of late disease come into this crop that makes me a little bit nervous,” said Chad Lee, extension agronomist with the University of Kentucky, referring to Southern Rust which spreads by windblown spores.

    “It could hurt the yield a little bit, but I think it’s safe to say we’ll have near-record yields,” Lee said.

  • Two new residents — a bobcat kitten and a juvenile bald eagle — are now on display at Salato Wildlife Education Center.

    The female kitten is about five months old and came from a wildlife rehabilitation facility in Kentucky. She succeeds an adult female that was in poor health and died some months ago, said Geoff Roberts, conservation educator at Salato.

    The youngster is "still very much a kitten, growing fast, but she's pretty adorable," Roberts said. "She has a lot of energy now."

  • I grew up being warned about using fresh wood products as mulch or soil amendments because, in theory, as the wood broke down it would tie up valuable nitrogen, stealing it away from the plants. Recent conclusions based on old and new field research- and practical experience- suggests otherwise. I have found that wood chips make an excellent soil conditioner and weed suppressant (almost more critical this year).

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    On a stage set to celebrate the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 52nd annual Country Ham Breakfast & Auction concluded tlast week with a show-stealing $400,000 bid for the Kentucky State Fair’s Grand Champion Ham.

  • Anne Patton Schubert, Taylorsville, Kentucky, has been elected as a delegate to the 132nd Annual American Angus Association Convention of Delegates, Nov. 5 at the Overland Park Convention Center in Overland Park, Kansas, reports Richard Wilson, Interim CEO of the American Angus Association.

  • Summer’s heat and dry weather can take a toll on your flower garden, but with a little extra care, it is possible to bring it back to life for a few more weeks of vibrant color and texture.

    With both annuals and perennials, making sure they get plenty of water is always important, but even more so in late summer. Annuals, in particular, will start to decline without an adequate supply of water to keep the ground moist.

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    It’s that time of the summer–tomato season! For those of us who love this fruit–yes, it is a fruit–it makes summer meals so easy, refreshing and tasty.

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    The dishwasher is an unsung hero of many a kitchen. When a dishwasher is working properly, it can make fast clean-up of scores of dishes, silverware and glasses.

    As handy as dishwashers can be, sometimes they seem to lose their cleaning power. While inadequate cleaning may indicate the time has come to replace the dishwasher, many times all the appliance needs is a little maintenance and TLC.

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    Dear Savvy Senior,

    What can I do to stop the perpetual prerecorded robocalls I keep getting? I’m signed up with the National Do Not Call Registry, but it seems like I still get three or four robo telemarketing calls a day offering lower credit card interest rates, medical alert devices and more.

    Fed Up Senior

    Dear Fed Up,

  • My neighboring vendor at the Belknap Farmers’ Market, Janet Haggerty, shared some little cherry tomatoes with me last week that came from a stray seedling: the little tomatoes where a dull yellow and about the size of a gooseberry. They were fantastic.

  • Farm Service Agency Administrator Val Dolcini today encouraged producers to examine the available U.S. Department of Agriculture crop risk protection options, including federal crop insurance and Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) coverage, before the sales deadline for fall crops.

  • The Spencer County Conservation District is accepting requests for cost share funding under the Kentucky Soil Erosion and Water Quality Cost Share Program.

    Among the 18 practices eligible under the State Cost Share Program are Agricultural Waste Utilization, Ag Waste Control Facilities, Stream Crossings, Heavy Use Area Protection, Winter Feeding Areas, Pasture and Hayland Erosion Control and Rotational Grazing System Establishment.

  • The Farm Service Agency recently announced that the Farm Storage Facility Loan (FSFL) program, which provides low-interest financing to producers to build or upgrade storage facilities, will now include dairy, flowers and meats as eligible commodities.

    “For 15 years, this program has provided affordable financing, allowing American farmers and ranchers to construct or expand storage on the farm,” said Dolcini. “By adding eligible commodities, these low-interest loans will help even more family farmers and ranchers to expand on-site storage.”

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    The National Society of High School Scholars (NSHSS) recently announced that Tamara Leigh Humphrey of Taylorsville, has been selected to become a member. The Society recognizes top scholars who have demonstrated outstanding leadership, scholarship and community commitment. Humphrey is a student at Spencer County High School.

  • Forty-three Gatton Academy students, including Joshua Baunach, a senior from Taylorsville, have returned home following a 23-day study abroad program to London and Harlaxton College in Grantham, England.

    Accompanying the students on the trip were Professor Walker Rutledge, WKU Department of English, and Dr. Julia Roberts, Beth Hawke, Zack Ryle and Danetra Hodge of the Gatton Academy.

  • Amid some controversy and opposition, the Spencer County High School Site-Based Decision Making Council Monday evening gave approval for the formation of a student club that will focus on promoting diversity within the school.

  • Eight students from Spencer County have been named Senator Jeff Green Scholars by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA). To earn this honor, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average each year of high school and at least a 28 composite on the ACT.

    These students have also earned $2,500 a year in Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES) awards. If they keep their grades up in college, they will have $10,000 to use toward a four-year degree.

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    Whenever we pass the middle of August, my thoughts always turn to the Kentucky State Fair. As a child growing up on a farm, during the end of August was always a busy time because we raised tobacco and that was time to harvest it and hang it in the barns. I didn’t go to the fair much during my childhood years, but the couple of times I was able to go, it certainly was an experience I won’t forget.