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Features

  • Dear Savvy Senior,

    Is pill splitting safe? I have several friends who cut their pills in half in order to save money, but I have some concerns. What can you tell me?

    Cautious Kim

    Dear Kim,

    Pill splitting – literally cutting them in half – has become a popular way to save on pharmaceutical costs but you need to talk to your doctor or pharmacist first, because not all pills can be split.

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    A pound of butter, a pound of sugar, a pound of flour and a pound of eggs—that’s the easy-to-remember recipe for an 18th-century pound cake, large enough to feed a family for days. Most of us don’t have large families to feed, and with the short days and long nights of January, we may be inclined to polish off the entire cake by ourselves.

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    The Spencer County FFA Farm Toy Show was held December 11-12 and attracted more than 1700 attendees for the weekend. The show featured over 50 vendors and 180 tables of items.

    One of the highlights of the show was the farmscape exhibits and judging. This year, the John S. Shouse Memorial Award, which is given to the top farmscape, was presented to Jesse Smith, Matthew Benedict, and Jake Graves from Springfield.

  • Every couple of years I like to revisit my father’s favorite Christmas poem inspired by Clement Moore’s famous work, ‘Night Before Christmas’. The writer is unknown, but he or she certainly was a gardener; and you may even get some last minute gift ideas from its verse.

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    The Spencer County Extension Office hosted the District 3 Holiday Staff meeting last week.

  • Few plants can liven up a winter day like the amaryllis.  The large pink, white, red, orange and variegated flowers are truly spectacular. Maybe you received an amaryllis bulb as a holiday gift.

    A member of the lily family, the amaryllis rises from a large bulb.  The growth habit makes it well suited for blooming during the colder months of the year.

  • Holiday greenery has a history that goes well beyond the Victorian Christmas tree we gather around today. Most of the holiday greenery we use to decorate dates back to the pagan holidays of the Romans and Northern Europeans when certain plants were chosen for their symbolic powers of restoration and protection.

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    Students at Spencer County High School lent a hand to local and state police during the Cram the Cruiser effort to collect food for various charitable programs. Students brought in food and blocked the doors of several teachers in the school last week, before they gathered it all together for the effort.

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    This week’s 11th grade MVB is Matthew Giveans. He has recently volunteered to help a special needs friend organize his backpack.  He is involved in baseball, band and military readiness. He is planning to go to college to become a commercial pilot.

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    Students at Spencer Christian School performed their Christmas program before several hundred people at Spencer Christian Church Sunday night. Preschool and kindergarten students sang a few songs, while older students performed a musical about “Hark, the Herald Angel.”

  • Representative James Tipton, R-Taylorsville (53rd District), announced this week an agreement has been reached between Kentucky and Indiana that will expand higher educational opportunities at a lower costs to students in Spencer County.  A Memorandum of Understanding between Indiana and Kentucky now includes Spencer County on the list of Kentucky counties for in-state tuition at Indiana University Southeast.

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    Alyssa Howie is the 9th grade Most Valuable Bear. Alyssa was nominated and selected by the SCHS faculty for her hard work and dedication. She is a well rounded student who is always willing to help others. She plays basketball, softball, and is part of the SCHS choir. She plans to go to college and major in education.

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    The Spencer County High School and Middle School Drama Department will present “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever” beginning this week.

    This hilarious Christmas classic, by Barbara Robinson, centers on a mother struggling to put on a church Christmas pageant, starring the Herdman kids, probably the most inventively awful kids in history. You won’t believe the mayhem - and the fun - when the Herdmans collide with the Christmas story head on.

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    Despite a generation gap that spans as many as eight decades, a group of fourth graders from Spencer County Elementary School are learning plenty from recent trips to Signature Healthcare nursing home.

    Fourth grade teacher Stephanie Sanford has taken her class to the home twice this year and the visits have proven beneficial for both students and residents.

    “I wanted to involve my students in a service project that would get them out of the classroom and into the community,” said Sanford.

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    Pulaski County farmer Mark Haney was re-elected president of Kentucky Farm Bureau on the concluding day of the organization’s 96th annual meeting. Also re-elected were Webster County’s Eddie Melton as first vice president and Hart County’s Fritz Giesecke as second vice president. They comprise KFB’s executive committee along with Executive Vice President David S. Beck.

  • The 2016 Kentucky Fruit and Vegetable Conference will have something of interest for all fruit and vegetable producers. The event runs from 8 a.m. Jan. 4 until 5 p.m. Jan. 5 at Lexington’s Embassy Suites hotel.

    Preconference activities on Jan. 3 will include tree fruit, small fruit, and vegetable roundtable discussions.

  • I have always managed to do well with African violets – I generally keep them in bloom year-round. Many complain that after the first flush of blooms fades, the only thing left is a year’s worth of fuzzy foliage. Well, with a little attention you can keep your African violet cycling in and out of bloom all year. The key is to create a favorable growing environment.

  • Several years ago I made the mistake of leaving the water pump in the barn instead of storing it in the basement. Well, I found out why Daddy always stored it in the basement during the cold days of winter. When I got the pump out to do some irrigation the following summer, the primer tank had split right open. A little bit of moisture was left in the tank and it froze. The tank is made of cast iron so imagine what a little moisture might do to your favorite terracotta pot.

  • Now that we are in December, everyone’s thoughts turn toward the holidays. Each year, I like to pass along the following tips and information about the most popular plant of the holiday season, the poinsettia.

    Traditional red and green colors are well represented in the flowers available for the holidays. Poinsettias, the most popular and spectacular holiday flowers, can combine both these colors.

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    Cub Scouts and Webelos collected hundreds of pounds of food for local families in need recently, just in time for the holidays. Packs 465 and 176 gathered 2,631 items of food, which were and will be used to fill food baskets for Thanksgiving and the Christmas holiday season. The food will be distributed to local families through the Community Based Action Agency.