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Opinion

  • Two weeks ago, I wrote an opinion letter published in the Magnet about a proposed tax increase being discussed by the Fiscal Court. My letter was critical of the justification and process (drip spend, drip raise taxes, drip repeat).

    An email on this subject was received, essentially informing me that I was wrong (all inclusive). Also the email indicated that all could have been explained if I had availed myself to scheduling a meeting with the sender.

  • I believe there are two types of pride. There’s the pride that comes before the fall, as the Bible defines. But there’s also the pride that helps pick us back up when we have fallen. The latter is not arrogance, but a recognition that we weren’t made to be failures.

    It’s ok for communities to have pride as well, especially when the object of that pride are the people who share it with us. Of course, sometimes the actions or inactions results in shame. Here’s a few examples:

  • Attorney General Jack Conway is right: the state Board of Education violated Kentucky’s open-meetings law when an ad hoc committee it hastily created in April conducted business in unannounced, closed-session conditions while hiring a search firm to aid in finding a replacement for outgoing commissioner Terry Holliday.

  • In case anyone forgot how incredible the people are in our small town, I would like to remind everyone.

    My husband passed away at the end of July. I have two children. I lost my father when I was 13 and remember how lost I felt. When I went back to school, nobody showed any kind of support. I was so worried that my children would feel the same way.

  • “It’s been years since I’ve talked about compensation [for the sale of fetal body parts], so let me just figure out what others are getting . . . . If [the price for selling the body parts is] low, we can bump it up. I want a Lamborghini.”

  • They say hindsight is 20/20, and that old adage is often proven true through television reruns.
    Some famous television characters were created and scripted to push a certain agenda and the writers intentionally framed their words and opinions to appear clownish, unintelligent and sometimes just outrageous. But inevitably, watching those shows today through the prism of time, lines originally intended to get laughs might now raise a few eyebrows and cause us to think, “You know what, they were right.”

  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of Engineers have released their final rule defining what they believe constitutes “waters of the United States.” This effort, in their own terms, is to provide clarity on what constitutes waters of the United States, and to protect streams and wetlands that we depend on for our health, communities, and economy.

  • It is so refreshing to have a newspaper editor come forward and lay out the truth on something as important as the current abortion debate. Watching the clips of the Planned Parenthood meeting with buyers of body parts is sickening to say the least. This brings to mind a recent bumper sticker that said “Seems to me that all the people in favor of abortion have already been born”. I think this sums it up!

    Arnie Mueller,
    Fisherville

  • I read the Magnet’s report of the Fiscal Court’s meeting with some wonderment. Maybe it’s just me but here are a couple of observations that contribute to the ‘wonderment’ of ‘What the heck is happening?’

    We have a Judge Executive who admitted that he could not read the budget in my presence. This contributes to the ‘wonderment’.

  • In about three months, Spencer County taxpayers will be receiving their tax bills, meaning local governments and taxing districts are now faced with setting tax rates.

    The annual debate over cutting costs or raising taxes is not exclusive to Spencer County, but a discussion had by elected officials at all levels.

  • There’s nothing civil about war, but that doesn’t always have to apply to the political process that seems to grow nastier, meaner and more vile every election cycle.

    In a sense, politics is a war - a war of ideas and philosophies. I’ve never been a fan of those who say compromise and bipartisanship are always the answer. Politics are partisan by nature, and that’s a good thing. Despite what’s taught in this post-modern world, there remains a difference between right and wrong, good and evil, and often politics are divided on those very lines.

  • I have a question for the Fair Board concerning the baby and youth show.

    Why would they let people from Spencer County (and they also work here with the public), be the judges for the show? The judges that I saw actually were talking to one of the mothers of the contestants prior to the starting of the show, and her child won.

  • “Silence in the face of evil is itself evil: God will not hold us guiltless. Not to speak is to speak. Not to act is to act.”
    - Dietrich Bonhoeffer

    In April of 1945, A German pastor named Dietrich Bonhoeffer was hung in a Nazi concentration camp. He’d spent most of the last two years of his life behind bars because he had devoted several years of his life before that speaking against the evil regime of Adolf Hitler.

  • Washington, DC has the bad news blues. Whether it’s Congress passing bills that spend billions of dollars we don’t have, rogue Supreme Court justices ignoring the clear text of the Constitution, or yet another unelected executive branch agency bureaucrat issuing a “regulation” that punishes free enterprise, it often seems that victories for freedom and liberty are rare.

  • Here is some good news for rural Americans who are concerned about the reliability of mail delivery following postal cutbacks for several years: Last week the Senate Appropriations Committee ordered a study of on-time mail delivery outside of the country’s urban areas. The National Newspaper Association, long an advocate on rural postal service issues because many smaller newspapers are delivered through the mail, applauded the study.

  • Washington, DC has the bad news blues. Whether it’s Congress passing bills that spend billions of dollars we don’t have, rogue Supreme Court justices ignoring the clear text of the Constitution, or yet another unelected executive branch agency bureaucrat issuing a “regulation” that punishes free enterprise, it often seems that victories for freedom and liberty are rare.

  • Twice a year, we do a county-wide mailing of the Spencer Magnet. That means every address in the county receives a copy of our newspaper, whether you subscribe or not.

    For many of you, receiving the Magnet is a weekly occurrence. You’ve grown accustomed to opening up your mailbox each week, then opening up the pages to find out what’s happening in your community.

  • For years, the Obama administration and its overzealous bureaucratic regulators at the EPA have waged a war against Kentucky coal jobs, miners, and their families. And I’ve vowed to do all I can to stop them. I’m pleased to report that recently the Senate Appropriations Committee, on which I serve, took an important step towards using Congress’s power of the purse to rein in the agency on several fronts, efforts that should help those not only in the coal industry but also farmers and Kentucky job creators.

  • Growing up in a military family, I was taught to respect a veteran, because they risk their lives to protect us so we could be free.

    So how do we thank them? We put up flags and tombstones. Then we feel good about ourselves, pat each other on the backs. Then what happens? No one remembers to maintain it. And in time, it begins to show its age.