• When I was 17-years-old, I crossed the stage in the gym of my high school, received my diploma, and then walked into my future. At that point, I had decisions to make that would impact the rest of my life. Among the most important – what was I going to do for the next 40-50 years.


  • Mrs. “Sissy” Myrtle F. Goodpaster, age 80, of Cox’s Creek, returned to her Heavenly Father on February 11, 2018. Mrs. Goodpaster was born in Nelson County on July 1, 1937 to the late Hubert and Mildred Breeden.
    Among those who preceded her in death include her husband, Leonard E. Goodpaster, Sr.; son, Russ Lee Goodpaster; sister, Carolyn Trent; and brothers, Junior Breeden and Ivo Mudd.

  • A small community in Western Kentucky said goodbye to two 15-year-old high school students on Sunday, less than a week after they were shot and killed, allegedly by a fellow student at Marshall County High School.
    The news of the school shooting shook not only that community, but small towns all across Kentucky. Even though the bullets that killed two and injured more than a dozen others were fired more than three hours away, the reality ricocheted here locally as minds immediately began wondering, “Could that happen here?”


  • On Tuesday of last week, Governor Matt Bevin presented his budget proposal while addressing the General Assembly in a Joint Session for the annual State of the Commonwealth. Kentuckians, along with members of the House and Senate, Cabinet Secretaries, and Supreme Court Justices, listened intently for what many feared would be one of the trimmest, most austere budgets in recent Kentucky history.

  • Governor Matt Bevin knew he was going to draw the ire of many last week when he presented a budget that called for many local school districts to tap into their reserves. He knew he would make many upset when he called for the elimination of 70 programs. And he knew he would not be making a lot of friends with a call for a 6.25 across the board cut in state spending.

  • After reading John Shindlebower’s column, I feel inspired! I have seen the light and have some suggestions for our Republican brethren. Let’s start charging admission to our new Public Library! This is a can’t-miss solution, not only on a local level, but statewide!

  • While the discussion in Frankfort lately is about pension reform, many believe the far more serious problem is the unfunded liability in each pension plan.

  • Every summer, Americans celebrate Independence Day and amidst all the picnics, ballgames and fireworks, some of us still try to honor the spirit of rugged individualism that America was built on.

    Here in Kentucky, many of us trace our roots back to hearty pioneers who followed the path through the Cumberland Gap, or who floated down the Ohio River on flatboats to settle this wild and beautiful land.

  • Former House Speaker Jody Richards recently joined the growing chorus of longtime Democratic legislators announcing they would not seek re-election this year.

    Richards, D-Bowling Green, who went to Frankfort the year Jimmy Carter was elected president, pounded the gavel in the House for 14 years, making him the longest-serving Speaker in Kentucky’s history.

  • The General Assembly is back in regular session as of January 2 and it looks to be another productive, busy time as over one hundred bills have already been filed, pension reform looms, and a $22 billion budget and road plan must be formulated, debated and passed into law.

    This session is twice as long as last year – 60 days, with our last day being April 15 – in order to craft a budget as well as typical legislation.

  • Tuesday was National Law Enforcement Officers Appreciation Day. It’s not a recognized national holiday or widely recognized by the general public, but it seems fitting that those men and women whose goal is to ‘serve and protect’ are worthy of a tip of hat or a pat on the back.

    We live in an age where there’s a lot of anger and suspicion directed at police officers. Some of it is warranted, but most of it is not.

  • In November 2016, the American people sent President Trump to the White House and Republican majorities back to Congress. We worked together to make 2017, by any objective standard, a year of extraordinary accomplishment. While the national media may overlook or downplay any of these successes, the fact remains that Congress has achieved a number of priorities this past year for the people we represent.

  • State government is shrinking under Gov. Matt Bevin, and state Sen. Julian Carroll, D-Frankfort, pre-filed a bill last month that aims to address that decrease.

  • Over the next couple of weeks, The Spencer Magnet will be reviewing and publishing our new letters policy that will cover letters during the upcoming primary election season.

    Our intent is to allow the free exchange of ideas and opinions, but not to permit this newspaper to be used as a tool by those who wish to cast personal campaigns. We will also be looking at limits to how often and when actual candidates can submit letters to the editor.

  • As we wrap up Christmas and 2017 comes to a close, it is important to look back on all the significant accomplishments Kentucky has experienced this past year.

    It has been a record-breaking year for business investments thanks to pro-growth legislation passed by the Republican-controlled General Assembly. Kentucky has seen more than $8.5 billion invested in our economy and in our people. More than 14,900 new well-paid, full-time jobs have been created just since January.

  • My wife and I have reached that place in our lives where Christmas afternoons are quiet. Our children are married, which means they have other places to go. So after gifts are unwrapped, batteries are inserted into grandchildren’s toys, and those same toys are stepped on, lost and then found again - they pack up and move on to another home to repeat the chaos, leaving us with an free afternoon and evening.

  • At a fiscal court meeting, Linda George said the court has a right and obligation to limit some of the frivolous comments by citizens when citizens are allowed to make comments at the opening of the meeting and indeed they do. But I have a serious issue with that. What she is saying is the court should restrict the First Amendment rights of the citizens of freedom of expression. What is frivolous to her may be very important to the citizen making the comment.