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Opinion

  • After reading John Riley’s letter to the editor of November 1, 2017, and his reference to petty politics, I have to ask of his petty, dirty and childish politics of solely stopping the paving of the road I live on, at my property line.

    To add insult to injury, on the first county mowing, the mower stopped at my property line also. This mowing was followed in the fall after Johnson grass was taller than six feet.

  • State Representative Rocky Adkins, Democrat House Minority Leader, wrote a guest newspaper column “on behalf of the other 35 members of the Kentucky House Democratic Caucus” criticizing the proposed pension fix currently being debated in the legislature.

  • In the wake of allegations against Alabama Senate Candidate Roy Moore, I offer the following reminder that we in America have a moral and legal obligation of due process.

    Sexual abuse and assault are serious offenses and over the past several weeks, we’ve been bombarded with allegations, admissions and apologies from Hollywood over the abuse of women.

    It’s good that victims are willing to come forward to and that they are being listened to.

  • An initial statement by House Majority Leader Jonathan Shell last Friday that then-Speaker Jeff Hoover “has the full support” of the Republican caucus following claims of a sexual harassment settlement were as wrong as a preliminary police report that Sen. Rand Paul suffered only “minor injuries” when physically assaulted by a neighbor at his home in a gated community in Bowling Green.

    It didn’t take long for the truth about the attack on Paul to come out; he suffered bruised lungs and several broken ribs – hardly “minor.”

  • The pension crisis continues to dominate headlines across Kentucky as state lawmakers wrestle with ways to preserve the retirement systems for teachers and other state workers without bankrupting the Commonwealth’s coffers.

    Years of mismanagement and inadequate funding have resulted in the real possibility that the system will run out of money to pay the promised pensions of those about to retire and those already retired, not to mention those who are just starting or who are in the middle of their careers.

  • This week all across our nation individuals and communities will honor our Veterans. Originally called Armistice Day, this recognition was enacted by President Woodrow Wilson to mark the end of World War 1 on November 11, 1918. Congress made this a federal holiday in 1938 and the name was changed to Veterans Day in 1954. The original resolution says, “the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding.”

  • As an American, what scares you the most? Is it Russian attempts to meddle in and influence our elections? Could it be the growing nuclear threat posed by North Korea or the continued danger from radical Islamic terrorism?

    Those outside threats are indeed worth keeping a close eye on and even taking proactive steps to thwart any attempts to endanger us or our allies.

  • Enough is Enough!

    I watched first hand with my history classes as the twin towers fell, the Pentagon was attacked, and the passengers of Flight 93 sacrificed themselves in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.  Like many other Americans, I said I was willing to give up a little privacy to make flying safer.

  • As County Judge Executive I have had many concerned citizens and county employees asking if I will be running for re-election. So, I want to take this opportunity to publicly answer that question. My answer right now is: I don’t know, yet.  Here’s why.

  • I am deeply concerned about the pension reform framework recently made public.

    These proposals challenge the contract rights of members, lower the standard of living of employees now and in retirement, and will worsen the cash-flow crisis in the state employee pension plan.

  • “If these United States can be called a body, then Kentucky can be called its heart.” - Jesse Stuart.

    As fall break ended this weekend, hundreds of folks from our community made the long trek home from the beach or some other far-away vacation land after a nice break from the routine.

  • “Keeping the Promise,” our plan to save Kentucky’s pension systems, keeps the promise made to Kentucky’s current employees while also meeting the legal and moral obligations we owe to those who have already retired. Promises made are promises kept.

    Make no mistake: there will be no changes, clawbacks or reductions to the paychecks of current retirees, and there will be protections for healthcare benefits. That is a promise you can literally take to the bank.

  • What does it mean to be a retired teacher? If people were polled individually, the answer would be as varied as people’s interest. No matter what it means to you personally, collectively, the Kentucky Retired Teachers Association (KTRA) celebrates Retired Educators Week, October 15-21.

    Retired teachers continue to render valuable services in diverse leadership roles in their communities.

  • The wildfires in California continued to rage this week. They are destroying homes, property and have claimed over 40 lives and scores more are still missing.

    It should be a good reminder for us that fire is dangerous, unpredictable and can easily spread out of control. While we tend to think of wildfires being confined to the west, it’s important to remember that flames do not read maps. Fires can just as easily get out of control in your backyard and pose a threat to you and your neighbors.

  • Last week’s announcement that the Boys Scouts of America would begin opening up their dens and troops to girls, came as no real surprise, although as an Eagle Scout and someone whose fondest childhood memories involve Scouting, it was disappointing.

    There was no shock because BSA officials have been cowering to the pressures of progressives for a couple of decades now. Despite a code that vows to teach young men to be strong, courageous and loyal, the corporate heads of BSA have shown a propensity to be scared, weak and quick to compromise on its core values.

  • I have empathy for the residents of Watkins Glen subdivision who spoke to Fiscal Court about having an unpaved section of their road completed, as promised by the developer.  In my opinion, the county made a promise to the residents when they approved the subdivision and road bond.  I’m surprised the county allowed the bond to lapse.