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Opinion

  • The Kentucky State Fair is one of the highlights of the agricultural year in Kentucky. As a farm kid from Scott County, I have many fond memories of past state fairs. It’s a chance to rub elbows with our neighbors, reunite with friends from across the Commonwealth, and show off the best that Kentucky agriculture has to offer. The 113th edition of this great tradition is Aug. 17-27, and, as always, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) is pleased to be a part of it.

  • The Battle of Charlottesville is over, with one person dead and a nation embarrassed.

    Yes, it was a battle, carried out by two hateful sides who came armed with sticks, bottles, rocks and wearing uniforms that included helmets and shields. Neither side was intending to engage in any civil debate. This was designed to be a battle and that only one person was killed is evidence that the cowards on both sides apparently like to dress up like soldiers, but have the actual warrior skills of toddlers - slapping, stomping and then quickly retreating.

  • A bunch of white supremacists and neo-Nazi’s hold a rally in a public park.  A bunch of anti-whites including Black Lives Matter racists show up to hassle them and the fight was on.  A nutcase terrorist kills and injures people by running them down with his car.  And, who gets the blame for this?  Donald Trump.  That’s insanity.

    People in the media, you ignored the BLM people.  You look like you are afraid you will be called racists if you tell the truth.

  • If you have not yet seen Dinesh D’Souza’s new book  “The Big Lie” - it addresses exactly what is happening with this weekend’s terroristic action and the media’s reaction.  I wish he had done the movie version first. This country needs it now.  

  • For some 3,000 students in Spencer County Public Schools, today marks a clean slate, a new beginning and a fresh start.

    There will be tears and sobs for the youngest ones today, and their parents. Those entering preschool and kindergarten will cling to family until the first bell rings and then they’ll embark on a journey that will last for at least the next 13 years.

  • Americans love to panic. We seem to flourish when there’s something on the horizon to worry or fret about. We are quick to toss common sense out the window and imagine the worst possible scenarios.

    If you doubt that, pay attention this winter when the forecast calls for a chance of 2-4 inches of snow and then try to find a gallon of milk.

    But snow panic takes a back seat to some of the other causes for concern in the minds of many Americans.

  • The Outdoor Industry Association (OIA) announced last week that the economic impact of outdoor recreation in Kentucky totaled $12.8 billion dollars last year, up from $8.4 billion in 2012. This is the first national economic impact study since 2012.

    The report indicates that Kentucky directly supports 120,000 jobs and annually generates $12.8 billion in consumer spending and $756 million in state and local tax revenue.

    OIA’s report also highlights that 61 percent of Kentucky’s 4.44 million residents participate in outdoor recreation each year.

  • The United States of America has the best health care for its citizens when you look at its quality of service, health care technology, and responsiveness, that can’t be matched by any other nation on earth.  It is so important that we maintain this quality of health care services, but can we afford its cost?  

  • I was neither a great nor eager student. By mid-September, I was already looking forward to the end of the school year. But like almost every kid, I found the first day of school to be exciting.

    It was pretty much the only time I was organized, with my pencils and papers neatly tucked away in my box or folder, my shoes free from dirty scuffs and a clean slate to impress my new teachers.

    The fresh start had me excited about school and at least for a few days, enthusiastic and motivated to do my best.

  • Across Kentucky, community leaders, health care professionals, public policy makers and law enforcement officials are stepping up to address the opioid epidemic. The Kentucky Academy of Family Physicians is one of the many groups working to stop opioid abuse before it starts and to help those who are already struggling with opioid use disorders.

  • I hope that you and your family are doing well as we prepare to close out the month of July. I have been very busy since the legislature adjourned back on March 30. I have attended many meetings and events in House District 53 as well as our Joint Interim Committee Meetings in the General Assembly. I have received many calls, letters and emails on a variety of issues, but without a doubt the discussion has primarily been on the possibility of a special session being called by Governor Bevin.

  • The first permanent farm bill was passed in 1938 when farming was much different than it is today. But the purpose of the bill still basically remains the same; to establish and oversee programs that maintain an abundant food supply and help farm families be successful.

  • Imagine learning to read without first learning the alphabet. Imagine trying to compute mathematical problems without a basic understanding of numbers. Imagine attempting to build a skyscraper without digging a solid foundation.

    There are basic fundamentals required to fully understand any subject or task, and for that reason, legislation in Kentucky that will now pave the way for the Bible to be taught in school as history and literature, will make for a much more educated and informed citizenry.

  • Last Tuesday’s forum, called in response to a rash of thefts in Elk Creek, had the potential to be ugly. Residents had been victimized and right or wrong, some were pointing fingers at local law enforcement for not patrolling their neighborhoods adequately.

  • Few things are as small-town American as the County Fair. For generations, rural communities gathered in one place for a week or more to celebrate, compete, fellowship and get acquainted or reacquainted with others in their county. More often than not, it was the largest gathering of folks in one place during the entire year and it was a highlight of everyone’s summer.

  • My two oldest grandsons recently celebrated their birthdays, as they were turning six and five years old. This is a fun time for them, and for me, as they’re reaching the age when toys can be fun for all of us.

    Rattles, stuffed bears, blocks and toys for babies and toddlers are fine I guess for that age, but now these guys are about to engage in some real fun.

  • After celebrating our nation’s Independence Day, I traveled around the Commonwealth to hear directly from Kentuckians.  By engaging with families, individuals, and community leaders across the state, I am better able to bring their concerns to the United States Senate and serve as their voice in Washington.

  • Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has been at odds with several members of the Kentucky media, most notably, Kentucky’s largest daily newspapers - The Courier-Journal and the Herald-Leader. Bevin has taken to social media to share his message out and has not shied away from blasting those in the press with whom he is at odds.

  • The Magnet posted a story about mail delivery on Tanglewood Drive being halted due to road conditions last week.  Many readers will remember previous stories about how I have been unsuccessfully petitioning Fiscal Court to adopt the street into the county road system for maintenance.  Tanglewood Drive is unique because, years ago, the county required a road bond, which they oversaw the collection of in the early 1990s.  However, I can find no records of how this money was spent, or if there was any oversight beyond collection.