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Opinion

  • Here is some good news for rural Americans who are concerned about the reliability of mail delivery following postal cutbacks for several years: Last week the Senate Appropriations Committee ordered a study of on-time mail delivery outside of the country’s urban areas. The National Newspaper Association, long an advocate on rural postal service issues because many smaller newspapers are delivered through the mail, applauded the study.

  • Washington, DC has the bad news blues. Whether it’s Congress passing bills that spend billions of dollars we don’t have, rogue Supreme Court justices ignoring the clear text of the Constitution, or yet another unelected executive branch agency bureaucrat issuing a “regulation” that punishes free enterprise, it often seems that victories for freedom and liberty are rare.

  • Twice a year, we do a county-wide mailing of the Spencer Magnet. That means every address in the county receives a copy of our newspaper, whether you subscribe or not.

    For many of you, receiving the Magnet is a weekly occurrence. You’ve grown accustomed to opening up your mailbox each week, then opening up the pages to find out what’s happening in your community.

  • For years, the Obama administration and its overzealous bureaucratic regulators at the EPA have waged a war against Kentucky coal jobs, miners, and their families. And I’ve vowed to do all I can to stop them. I’m pleased to report that recently the Senate Appropriations Committee, on which I serve, took an important step towards using Congress’s power of the purse to rein in the agency on several fronts, efforts that should help those not only in the coal industry but also farmers and Kentucky job creators.

  • Growing up in a military family, I was taught to respect a veteran, because they risk their lives to protect us so we could be free.

    So how do we thank them? We put up flags and tombstones. Then we feel good about ourselves, pat each other on the backs. Then what happens? No one remembers to maintain it. And in time, it begins to show its age.

  • This letter is being written to make the public aware of issues that the County and City face on a daily basis. Spencer County has been an agriculture county since the pioneer days. The impounding of Salt River and the creation of Taylorsville Lake in 1982 by the U.S. Corps of Engineers has brought in millions of dollars in needed revenues related to “boating and fishing” activities.

  • Guest Editorial, The Bowling Green Daily News
    While the pretty wrapping paper and multicolored bow appears attractive on the outside, once the Obamacare package is opened, the soaring costs, broken promises and unintended consequences are exposed for all to see.
    In recent days, we have learned about the proposed merger of Kentucky-based Humana and Aetna. There are also reports that Anthem and Cigna Corp. have rekindled merger talks.

  • Americans crave their independence, or at least we claim to. Earlier this month, we celebrated 239 years of independence with parades, concerts, fireworks and other celebrations. I sometimes wonder how much of it is just show.
    Few people, outside of those who espouse Socialism, will admit to wanting government to do all things for all people. However, increasingly we see a willingness to shirk our own responsibilities if we think the folks in Washington, Frankfort or down at City Hall will do for us, what we ought to be doing for ourselves.

  • It’s shark week. The annual cable television phenomenon started by the Discovery Channel several years ago has become a summer-time tradition that has millions of eyes glued to the screen.

    There’s something fascinating about the man-eating sharks of the deep, especially in light of news reports of them feeding on swimmers in the shallows of the Carolinas.

  • More than four decades ago, seven justices of the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that abortion was the law of the land. Two dissented. The battle is not over.

  • There are two very real dangers posing a threat to Taylorsville. One is a devastating flood. The other is continued inaction by local leaders.

  • When I was younger, I had a Confederate flag license plate on the front of my car. It was a 1974 Mustang that I paid $500 for and I used that car to deliver pizzas, drive to school, to church and it took me everywhere I needed to go.

    The flag had nothing to do with my attitude towards people of other races. Although admittedly, it may have had something to do with my attitude toward people who looked down their noses at anyone who lived in the country or in the south.

  • This Sunday is Father’s Day and many dads will be enjoying spending time with their kids, sharing dinner and opening gifts. Sadly, many won’t.

    The phone companies used to report that Mother’s Day was one of the busiest days of the season as children made sure to call home and talk to mom. Florists and card shops also do a brisk business on that Sunday in May that honors the women in our lives.

    However, Father’s Day for many is an afterthought. Unfortunately, for many men, fatherhood is an afterthought.

  • At a recent House Rules committee hearing, one of my colleagues from New York declared that the potholes in the roads in her district are so bad, “you can lose your car in them.” Kentuckians and Americans from all over the country agree. It is long past time that something was done to address the deplorable state of the highways and infrastructure in this country.

  • The Wilderness Road was blazed through southeastern Kentucky and wound it’s way up to the outskirts of the Bluegrass region. It was originally a buffalo path, later a trail for Shawnee, Cherokee and hunters of other tribes, and finally was the road Daniel Boone and his followers used to settle Kentucky.

  • I’m beginning to understand the frustration of older generations who simply find it impossible to keep up with the English language.

    Those under 20, or those under 40 who want to act like they’re under 20, think it’s cool to misuse common words and twist their definitions to mean something entirely different than what Webster suggests.

  • First, I need to apologize to Jerry Davis and Mike Moody for not acknowledging their efforts to control the spending of fiscal court during Bill Karrer’s administration. Sorry about that fellows. Also, from time to time, David Goodlett and Hobert Judd protested some of the expenditures, but spending was still high. That leaves the big spender that supported Bill Karrer.