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Opinion

  • Few things are as small-town American as the County Fair. For generations, rural communities gathered in one place for a week or more to celebrate, compete, fellowship and get acquainted or reacquainted with others in their county. More often than not, it was the largest gathering of folks in one place during the entire year and it was a highlight of everyone’s summer.

  • My two oldest grandsons recently celebrated their birthdays, as they were turning six and five years old. This is a fun time for them, and for me, as they’re reaching the age when toys can be fun for all of us.

    Rattles, stuffed bears, blocks and toys for babies and toddlers are fine I guess for that age, but now these guys are about to engage in some real fun.

  • After celebrating our nation’s Independence Day, I traveled around the Commonwealth to hear directly from Kentuckians.  By engaging with families, individuals, and community leaders across the state, I am better able to bring their concerns to the United States Senate and serve as their voice in Washington.

  • Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has been at odds with several members of the Kentucky media, most notably, Kentucky’s largest daily newspapers - The Courier-Journal and the Herald-Leader. Bevin has taken to social media to share his message out and has not shied away from blasting those in the press with whom he is at odds.

  • The Magnet posted a story about mail delivery on Tanglewood Drive being halted due to road conditions last week.  Many readers will remember previous stories about how I have been unsuccessfully petitioning Fiscal Court to adopt the street into the county road system for maintenance.  Tanglewood Drive is unique because, years ago, the county required a road bond, which they oversaw the collection of in the early 1990s.  However, I can find no records of how this money was spent, or if there was any oversight beyond collection.

  • Rain, rain, go away and come again another day. As I sit on my front porch waiting to see if my house is going to get flooded, I ponder on why I wonder.

    My parents purchased the house in 1976 and I do not believe that most of you reading this know the battle that my parents faced with the backing up of water in the drainage pipe that was placed on their property by Spencer Farm Service and the City of Taylorsville. Beware of what is placed on your property by others.

  • Americans celebrated Independence Day on Tuesday. They did it with baseball games, cookouts, days at the lake or beach and fireworks.

    (Actually, the fireworks have been going off for more than a week, and those who spent their electric bill money on grossly discounted explosives at the fireworks stands over the past few days, will be lighting them off for several more nights, to the dismay of those with small children and dogs).

  • For the nearly 900,000 smokers in Kentucky, there has never been a better time to quit.

    During the 2017 legislative session, the General Assembly passed much needed legislation to equip individuals addicted to tobacco with the tools they need to quit successfully. The smoking cessation coverage bill (Senate Bill 89) removes barriers that limit patient access to evidence-based cessation treatments.

  • The State of California recently announced that it is banning any state-funded travel to Kentucky. That means state employees, athletic teams of state universities and anyone traveling on the taxpayer dime from California will be banned from our wonderful Commonwealth.

    Why?

    Simply because Kentucky values freedom and the liberties that our Founding Fathers tried to secure and preserve for us over 240 years ago.

  • Over two hundred years ago, our Founding Fathers put their lives on the line to create a new country in which freedom reigned. These men had a vision of a nation unafraid to face its enemies and win. We, the people of the United States, have faced insurmountable odds since our young country’s conception but continue to fight for our God-given rights unique to the United States of America.

  • In 2015, the majority of Kentuckians in 106 counties voted for a governor they believed would change the trajectory of the state for the better: Matt Bevin. Voters were tired of the political status quo—unfunded pensions, deep-seated political corruption, false promises, and thousands of jobs lost to neighboring states.  

  • Of all the issues local government entities face, it’s hard to imagine that approving the minutes from previous meetings would generate controversy. Never underestimate small town politics.

    For several months, some on the Spencer County Fiscal Court have taken issue with County Clerk Lynn Hesselbrock’s insistence upon providing word-for-word transcripts of some discussions held in fiscal court meetings as part of the minutes.

  • University of Louisville fans reacted with shock last week when the NCAA handed down harsh penalties in the wake of a scandal involving the Cardinal basketball team, strippers and prostitutes.

    Sadly, there seems to be more outrage expressed by fans and some within the administration over the penalties than with the sordid details of the actual allegations.

    That’s a sad commentary on our society, but also a pretty accurate gauge of the importance we place on college sports these days. It should also be a wake-up call.

  • Civility is on life support. But the body politic was sick long before James T. Hodgkinson assaulted GOP Congressmen at a baseball practice, critically wounding Con. Steve Scalise and wounding five others after asking whether the men on the field were Republicans or Democrats.

  • This past weekend, some friends and I took a canoe trip down the Kentucky River. It was a secluded, 18-mile stretch beginning at Camp Nelson and winding through the beautiful Kentucky River Palisades to High Bridge.

    It was also remote. From Friday morning when we left Camp Nelson, until nearly mid-day on Saturday, we never saw another soul. No sounds of cars, no other boats, simply near-wilderness on both sides of the river.

  • While employed as an instructor at the University of Kentucky’s School of Journalism, former hostage Terry Anderson recounted his five-year battle with federal agencies to obtain copies of public records under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) relating to the government’s efforts to secure his release from Hezbollah kidnappers during his nearly seven-year captivity.

  • The Stars and Stripes have long represented the values and history of the United States, but oftentimes we do not know or fully understand how to respect “Old Glory’s” presence. On June 14, 2017, we celebrate the annual Flag Day to honor our nation’s emblem. In light of that holiday, Memorial Day, and the quickly-approaching Fourth of July, I thought it relevant to share some of the United States’ tradition, regulations, and laws pertaining to the American flag, all of which can be found in various government publications.

  • Rep. James Tipton, a Taylorsville Republican and member of the House Education Committee, has been appointed by Speaker Jeff Hoover to the Education Committee of the Southern Legislative Conference (SLC).

  • For the past eight years, the people of Kentucky endured an economy that failed to live up to its potential.  Kentuckians wanted growth, jobs, and improved wages, but the Obama Administration responded with a highly regressive regulatory rampage that hurt the economy and empowered Washington bureaucrats.