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Opinion

  • by Sen. Jimmy Higdon

  • Editorial courtesy of the
    Lexington Herald Leader

  • We are glad to see that the City of Taylorsville and the Spencer County Levee, Flood Control and Drainage District No 1 could come to an agreement on two issues of supreme importance to the citizens of Taylorsville and Spencer County.

  • This fall, the citizens of Spencer County have an opportunity to select new government leaders. I’m sure there are many good people running for office.
    I want to share some experiences I had with one of them. His name is Woodie Cheek.
    I met Woodie when we came together to oppose the proposed airport in 2008.
    What impressed me were his leadership skills, imagination, and work ethic.

  • I have read the article about the Spencer County Jailer in the Bardstown newspaper. It is entirely possible that the shield separating the driver from prisoners is required by state law. Jailer Herndon did not have the shield closed and now a troubled kid may spend half his life behind bars because of a small failure in professionalism. A small failure that almost got the jailer killed. I sure hope this kids parents aren’t able to file suit on the county over this. KRS 441 section 115 allows for training expenses for the jailer. Maybe that would be a good place to start.

  • by JIM ZACHARY, Director of the Transparency Project

  • I have followed the one sided conversation of Spencer County road deicing with a jaundiced eye. To me it is much ado about nothing (with attributes to Shakespeare).

  • by Sen. Jimmy Higdon

  • Coal Ash vs Road Salt

  • Last week’s Bill Nye/Ken Ham debate over the viability of Creationism probably did not change any minds, but it may have opened some. For decades, the secularists have pushed the narrative that science and faith are like oil and water.

  • In regard to complaints made by the public about not being provided inside accommodations during executive sessions of the City of Taylorsville’s public meetings, there were several statements made by Mayor Don Pay, City Clerk Steve Biven and City Attorney Dudley Dale that were far from the truth.
    In the Feb. 13 Magnet article “AG says local government shouldn’t kick public to the curb,” Pay stated, “In eight years of being mayor, this has never come up.”

  • My name is Dave Barnes and I have called and went before the board and complained. Our county officials don’t want to hear it.
    Go online and you will find mountains of information on coal ash and you will see the bad far outweighs the good. The state does not use it. The federal government does not want to label it hazardous material, because they would then be responsible for billions in cleanup and health issues.

  • We read with great interest the opinion piece in last week’s paper regarding Family Court Judge John David Myles. The portrayal of Judge Myles could not be further from our experience with him and his Court.
    Judge Myles was always prepared, professional and fair to all who appeared before him. He is a passionate advocate for children, education and families. Add to that a loyal friend, devoted husband and hard worker.

  • The day is finally here. Ever since Judge John David Myles was first elected to take the bench of the Family Court Division of the 53rd Judicial Circuit in November 2006, I have waited to write this letter. He has recently announced he will seek a second term in the next election.

  • I am writing in response to the article about winter road-clearing operations. Spencer County uses cinders, a form of coal ash. Coal ash is the waste that is left after coal is combusted.
    Now, this letter is not an attack on coal. I am just providing the facts about what is left after you burn coal. Coal ash typically contains heavy metals including arsenic, barium, lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium and selenium, to list a few. If inhaled, these toxins can cause cancer, respiratory distress and other health issues.

  • We must give credit where credit is due. We want to thank Mayor Don Pay and the Taylorsville City Commission for doing right by residents and other interested parties who attended the special meeting Thursday night, Feb. 6,