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Opinion

  • We are now into the “lazy, hazy days of summer,” according to the song. We have many issues we need to address so we can forget lazy. First up, we have been very lucky to have been approved for a grant from the Kentucky Pride Fund to purchase a new heavy duty baler for the recycling center. The new baler will help compact cardboard and paper products into tighter bales and create more bales in less time.

  • Contrary to the liberal media’s opinion that the Tea Party has passed it’s prime, the event in Washington D.C. last Wednesday proved otherwise. Both the east lawn and west lawn of the U.S. Capitol building were covered with thousands of patriotic Americans exercising their First Amendment Freedom of Speech.
    The topic of east lawn speakers was the “Gang of 8” immigration bill (a secure border was promised with the 1986 Amnesty bill, but never delivered — now we have untold millions here illegally).

  • The use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others — that’s the definition of bullying and it has been all too familiar in Spencer County these days.
    While we know this is a pressing issue in our schools, the bullying we’d rather address today comes straight from our elected officials.
    Over the last 10 days, members of our staff have been told the following from those “trusted” with serving this community:

  • We have completed our Spring Roadside Litter Abatement Drive with the largest number of groups to date. With almost 1,900 bags of litter contained, we can feel sure that for a short time, at least, our county is more presentable to visitors.
    Our county tire amnesty held in May netted 1,580 scrap tires that will not end up in Salt River or Brashears Creek, etc. We have had good luck to date in having the cooperation of our citizens when we have a cleanup/takeback event of any type.

  • There is a definite divide between what would normally be classified as an expense as opposed to what is considered an investment, and your accountant would advise you to keep the two separated when it comes time to file your taxes. However, when it comes to advertising, it is my contention that the lines blur and even intermingle between the two in many regards, and I will gladly explain how I’ve come to this way of thinking.

  • A move by one of Chicago’s largest daily newspapers sent shock-waves through the journalism world recently — the Chicago Sun-Times laid off its entire photography department.
    For those who are not as up-to-date on the field as those of us who are in it, photographers are a luxury that typically only larger newspapers can afford.
    I’ve worked for two newspapers who had their own employees who were strictly devoted to photography — my college paper, The Kentucky Kernel, and The State Journal in Frankfort, both of which are dailies.

  • Readers will have a new writer for the Spencer Magnet, but not for long. I’m the summer intern and will be spending 10 weeks in Taylorsville working at the paper.
    I’m 20 years old and will be starting my third year at the University of Kentucky this fall. With Spencer County’s relative close proximity to Louisville and the Cardinals, I only hope that won’t be held against me.

  • Last Thursday evening, I had the opportunity to witness greatness on a number of levels.
    The Spencer Magnet was invited to attend and cover a “Night at the Museum” at Spencer County Middle School, pictures from which can be found in our B section this week.
    Art Teacher Stacy LaRue explained to our staff that each of her advanced art students and art club members would have a table of their work set up in the school’s cafeteria to display to friends and family.

  • While some progress has been made regarding teen driver safety, motor vehicle crashes remain the number one killer of teenagers between the ages of 15 and 20. In 2012, nationally there were more than 25,200 crashes involving drivers under the age of 21. These crashes resulted in more than 8,000 injuries and 95 fatalities.

  • This week I had the pleasure of writing a story about a man that I vividly remember as a child — Spencer County Elementary School Principal Dale Kleinjan.

  • When I was a kid, we did not have a large amount of waste to dispose of. The top of a tin can was saved to use when a mouse would chew a hole in the floor or baseboard of a building. The can was saved to store small items such as tacks. What was paper waste got burned. Everybody had a hollow or sinkhole to dispose of the unusable waste.

  • Right around a decade ago – yes, that makes me feel old; you’ll see why – if you had stumbled into Bell County High School, you could have seen yours truly as Alice in “Alice in Wonderland” or Helena in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”
    Some of the nights spent rehearsing and putting together props are some of my best memories from my senior year of high school.

  • NOTE: Editor Shannon Brock and Freelancer John Shindlebower each tackle a side of the question, "Was NBA player Jason Collins 'courageous' in announcing publicly that he is gay?"

  • NOTE: Editor Shannon Brock and Freelancer John Shindlebower each tackle a side of the question, "Was NBA player Jason Collins 'courageous' in announcing publicly that he is gay?"

  • The old saying goes that “good help is hard to find.” With that saying, this week, I will respectfully disagree.
    Although most of you haven’t had a chance to meet the newest byline to grace the pages of The Spencer Magnet, you may have noticed that Phyllis McLaughlin has authored quite a few stories for us over the past seven weeks.

  • Every time I listen to the parents of the children who were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary, I am profoundly sad. I have three boys and the grief and pain that a parent feels when their child is taken is hard to fathom. I can only imagine the magnitude of their grief.

  • I spent Friday night on the couch trying to fight off what has now become a full-fledged cold. So much for that, but it’s not like I would have moved from in front of the tv anyway. When my eyes weren’t reading the latest tweets to stay updated, they were glued to the national new stations as America awaited the capture of a terrorist.
    Once the suspects in the April 15 Boston Marathon bombings were identified, law enforcement officials in and around Boston spent hour after hour trying to capture them.

  • We have seen a break in the cooler temperatures we have had since March, so we can now plan our events. Our non-profit groups are in the middle of our Spring Roadside Litter Cleanup, so the warmer weather will be an aid for their efforts.
    If you have a collection of outdated, not needed private files accumulated (think old tax returns) do not forget that this coming Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon, the Spencer County Public Library will host the Shred It Company, which offers free shredding for your old private papers. The truck will be at the library parking lot.

  • On Sept. 11, 2001, I was a junior in high school. If I took you back to my hometown and we walked the halls of Bell County High, I could point to the spot where I stood when I heard about the first plane hitting the World Trade Center. I could walk you through the classrooms I sat in and watched the nonstop coverage of the attacks on America. I could recall the sick feeling in my stomach and the fear racing through my mind.
    Eleven years and seven months later, that same sick feeling returned to me as I sat at my desk here at The Spencer Magnet.

  • Newspapers are essential, no doubt. The newspaper industry is strongest today in smaller communities, much like our own. One reason this is true is because we have the luxury of knowing and caring about our neighbors and the greater majority of us have beloved family members residing here, too.
    Without reservation, I’ll say that in Spencer County, the community ties are strong.