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Opinion

  • There is a great battle taking place in our communities. Too many have seen their sons and daughters fall victim to heroin and drug addiction. This has resulted in much anguish and pain for many families with the loss of life from overdoses and the daily turmoil of an addicted loved one.

  • The year 2016 has been full of political drama, locally, in Frankfort, and of course, nationally with the most surreal presidential election in our nation’s history that’s hitting a peak during convention time.

    It’s been a year of local battles over budgets and funding that took the county to the brink of a shutdown. In Frankfort, the feud between the current governor and the former governor’s family seems to play out with a new lawsuit every week.

  • Although summer break is coming to an end, summer weather—and hazards—will continue. However, there are a few things you can do to help keep your family safe, happy, and healthy for the rest of the season, especially while enjoying the great outdoors.

  • Whether Spencer County native J.D. Shelburne makes it to the top of the country charts is yet to be determined, but his concert on Main Street Saturday night certainly was a hit.

    That’s a credit not only to he and his band, but to the tireless efforts of those who helped plan and coordinate the show that resulted in a couple of thousand people gathering for a festive occasion.

  • The basic safety of the citizens of Spencer County has now been substantially decreased.  As the heroin epidemic sweeps our county and law enforcement officers across the nation are the new target for a sea of individuals with sick minds, what did our County Judge, John Riley do?  He pushed through a budget that drastically decreased  the funding for our sheriff’s department, which in turn, caused a decrease in available patrols.  

  • The first annual Hoop Off tournament was a success. We would like to thank Spencer Co. Fiscal Court for the opportunity of putting the tournament on. We would also like to thank the Spencer Co. Board of Education, Jim Oliver and custodians Anna Harely and Sharron Kanazel, Mike Marksbury and Scott Noel, athletic directors at SCHS and SCMS, and also Bart Stark.

    Also, thanks to Jennifer Downs, Jennifer Banta and Cheryl Downs, for taking up gate admission and the Spencer County Cobras for working concessions, and the Taylorsville City Police.

  • As a self-confessed news junkie, these are busy times. So much is happening in our nation and in our world, it’s enough to make your head spin. This is all the more reason to make sure the old noggin is screwed on straight. Among the things getting our attention this week:

    • The continued carnage in what appears to be an escalating conflict between law and anarchy. I hesitate to see this in terms of black and white, because while many in the media want to portray this as simply racial strife, I believe the issues are significantly more than skin deep.

  • In Kentucky, some bleed blue, others bleed red, and today, the Kentucky Retirement System (KRS) bleeds green. An article from the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting on June 7 outlined how KRS had used contributions from current and future state employees to pay legal fees for the former KRS Board Chair in a lawsuit against Governor Matt Bevin.

  • When Spencer County Parks Director Brian Spencer and his assistant, Adrian Downs, came before the fiscal court last week, they weren’t seeking a handout.

    Instead, they were seeking permission to move forward with an initiative to raise funds to bring some needed improvements to the local parks.

    Apparently, some of the playground equipment at both Ray Jewell Memorial Park, and Waterford Park is broken, and replacement parts are hard to come by because the playsets are obsolete.

  • It’s been a tragic week for law enforcement, a troubling week for race relations, and another embarrassing week for the news media.

    Two separate incidents in which two armed black men where shot by police officers quickly became the lead news stories by a media that seemed anxious to distract attention from Hillary Clinton’s email scandal.

  • While folklore about Davy Crockett is filled with stories of courage and daring, it’s Horatio Bunce, a respectable farmer in the Tennessee district represented by Crockett in Congress – at least in the version found in Edward S. Ellis’ biography about the larger-than-life “King of the Wild Frontier” – who’s the hero of this story.

  • Gridlock is not always a bad thing. In Washington, D.C., gridlock means the wheels of government turn slowly, and in an age when big government regulation often means more restrictions on Americans, the less accomplished, the better.

    But gridlock on the local level is almost never a good thing, and for that reason, we implore the members of the Spencer County Fiscal Court to look for ways to work together.

  • On Thursday of this week, a ship will be launched on dry land that will transport travelers not to a distant shore, but to a distant time some 4,000 years ago.

    Answers in Genesis, the ministry behind the Creation Museum in Petersburg, KY, outside of Cincinnati, will be christening their latest effort, the Ark Encounter, which includes a life-size replica of Noah’s ark, some seven stories high, over 500 feet long and being touted as the largest timber-framed structure in the world.

  • It’s the most recognizable phone number in the country and it’s one we teach our children to memorize at the earliest age because knowing it and dialing it can literally save a life.

    911 is the number Americans dial when there’s an accident, an injury, a fire, a crime or any type of emergency requiring immediate response from trained first-responders. The service is as much a part of public safety as the men and women in uniform who show up minutes later.

  • America turns 240 on Monday. There will be cookouts, parties, fireworks and a spirit of celebration. Such was what the founders predicted upon the passing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelephia in July of 1776.

    In fact, John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail the following prophetic note in a letter after he put pen to paper on that historic document:

  • If you happened by Ray Jewell Memorial Park this past Saturday, you saw and heard something that’s becoming increasingly rare these days. The sounds of kids playing, the sights of kids running and jumping–all were on full display. The same sights are common at Waterford Park during the soccer season.

    Thanks are in order to all the adults involved in all youth programs, whether they be sports, scouting, church-related or any other activities designed to get kids out of the house and involved.

  • When it comes to procrastination, I’m one of the worst offenders. Just ask my wife. The temptation to put off until tomorrow what should be done today is one I repeatedly struggle with.

    I’m not alone.

    The Spencer County Fiscal Court finally got serious about the budget Monday night. The only problem is, time is running out.

    By state law, counties must pass a balanced budget by the last day of June, to take effect the first day of July. However, the true deadlines fall a little earlier than that.