• The tumultuous election season is scheduled to end on November 8, when voters go to the polls. Most Americans will likely breathe a sigh of relief. But that same week, America will pause to honor the veterans whose sacrifice made voting possible.

  • I am writing to endorse Rep. James A. Tipton for re-election as State Representative for Spencer, Anderson and part of Bullitt counties.

    Kentucky needs leaders like Rep. Tipton. James has proven himself in this field as a farmer, real estate broker and a highly effective State Representative. As a native of Spencer County who grew up on a farm that he and his family still operated, Tipton has the sort of common sense that is changing State Government in a positive way.

  • The headline reads Right to Work in KY. The print size is easily twice as large as any other article, is in bold type and absolutely dominates the page. Unfortunately, the substance of the text just doesn’t live up to the hype. The simple fact is that “right to work” has absolutely nothing to do with anyone’s right to work; in Kentucky or anywhere in the United States. And the man who wrote the article knows it!

  • My wife and I didn’t take a cruise for our wedding anniversary last week, but we did board a huge ship that was docked on dry land in rural Grant County.

    We visited the Ark Encounter, the lifesize replica of Noah’s Ark that has  generated no shortage of controversy since its announced construction several years ago. It also continues to attract massive crowds, and on Saturday, we were just two of nearly 7,000 people who visited the attraction.

  • Improvise, adapt and overcome.

    Fans of Clint Eastwood may recognize that phrase, uttered by the actor when he played a combat-toughened Marine sergeant in the movie, “Heartbreak Ridge.”

    It’s an unofficial slogan of the USMC designed to inspire problem solving under less-than-ideal conditions. Apparently, that’s what Sheriff Buddy Stump is facing these days as his current building is infested with mold that may or may not be directly linked to the recent illnesses of two county employees who required hospital treatment.

  • What does it mean to be a retired educator? A person who volunteers countless hours to make our community a better place to live. A person, through his/her pension who contributes thousands of dollars in taxes and spends their money to support local businesses. A person who has made a difference in the lives of his/her former students. A person who never quits caring about the well-being of others.

  • This is National Retired Teachers Week and a good opportunity for us who made it out of the classroom to reflect back upon those who helped us succeed.

    I don’t have vivid recollections of a lot of my time in school. I’m not sure if that means I was traumatized somehow or just didn’t pay attention, but I marvel at people my age who can remember details about their second grade teacher, who they ate lunch with and activities they did in school.

  • Two policies impacted by state ballot initiatives and the presidential election itself that could also directly affect Kentuckians involve tobacco and right-to-work.

    The Bluegrass State has plenty of one but none of the other.

    Kentucky stood still while several states, including neighboring Indiana and West Virginia, moved forward with right-to-work policies, which protect employees from being forced to pay union dues in order to keep their jobs.

  • I would like to thank all who bought jewelry and other items that we sold at the Octoberfest on Saturday, October 1st. Gloria Williams was the winner of the blue and white afghan drawn from tickets bought for a fundraiser for the scholarship fund.

  • The return of the Quantrill historical marker came with little fanfare, just as it’s disappearance several months ago was noticed by few. Perhaps it’s because we drive by these historical markers located in various spots around the county and pay little attention to them. That’s a shame.

  • So America, do we really want to have this discussion?

    You say you’re outraged, flabbergasted and offended that a 59-year-old man would make such crude and perverted remarks about a woman? You say his comments are akin to condoning sexual assault or worse?

    You worry about what kind of damage such remarks being made public may do to our young people. We need to protect the innocence of our children, you say.

  • The new wrinkle in anti-smoking crusaders’ annual demand to raise Kentucky’s cigarette tax is that hiking taxes to fund the Medicaid expansion is somehow a better approach than moving able-bodied adults from government dependency to the fulfillment offered by work and independence.

  • It’s National Newspaper Week. While it’s not an occasion marked by parades or festivities, it is important to us and we hope you’ll stop for a moment and consider the valuable role newspapers play in American life.

    Here at the Spencer Magnet, we work hard to inform, record, listen and even entertain. Each week, we try to deliver news that affects you. We cover local government meetings, report on accidents, keep you abreast of local issues and let you know about important events coming up.

  • In just a little over a month, the presidential election should be over. I say ‘should’ because depending on who you talk to, there’s a number of schemes, conspiracies and plots being waged to rig the election, postpone the election or just outright cancel the election.

  • While state lawmakers attempt to rein in overspending and deal with a public-pension crisis spiraling out of control, Kentucky’s universities have figured out how to rake in even more dollars from students while spinning a narrative about Chicken Little trudging across their campuses, heading for the bell towers preparing to squawk: “This time, I really mean it! The sky is falling!”

  • One of the nice things about Spencer County is the fact that one rarely has to deal with crowds. But that might change this weekend, and we’re not complaining one bit.

    It’s a festive week in Spencer County, as the Octoberfest parade and subsequent activities get into full swing on Saturday. It’s an opportunity to celebrate life in a small town.

  • I want to thank everyone who was so kind and generous to Gerrie and I, especially Taylorsville Masonic Lodge 210 and the people in the community. I’m so grateful for the help everyone has given me.

    Thank you again.

    Neil McClain II and family
    Taylorsville, Ky

  • In many homes here in Spencer County, as well as across the nation, you’ll find refrigerators covered with children’s art work, photos, test papers and even glowing report cards. It seems the fridge is where families often do their boasting.

    Depending on the number of children, and their performance, it doesn’t take long for many of those refrigerator doors to get covered with copies of that perfect spelling test, the newspaper clipping or the blue ribbon won at the county fair.

  • I would like to make a suggestion to help eliminate some road litter and clean up our county. People post signs for yard sales, garage sales, birthday parties, weddings, etc., which is fine, but quite a few of them never get removed. They eventually become detached from where they were hanging and become roadside litter.

    Most of these signs have the date of the event and the address, so why not have a time limit for when they need to be removed? Twenty-four hours after the event seems like a fair amount of time.

  • These days it seems like we hear so much about what is going wrong with our community’s young people.  Ever feel scared about what the next generation is going to be like?

    If you are ever feeling disenchanted about the youth in our community please take a moment to go watch football players help get elementary kiddos out of their cars each home game Friday.