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Opinion

  • One of the nice things about Spencer County is the fact that one rarely has to deal with crowds. But that might change this weekend, and we’re not complaining one bit.

    It’s a festive week in Spencer County, as the Octoberfest parade and subsequent activities get into full swing on Saturday. It’s an opportunity to celebrate life in a small town.

  • I want to thank everyone who was so kind and generous to Gerrie and I, especially Taylorsville Masonic Lodge 210 and the people in the community. I’m so grateful for the help everyone has given me.

    Thank you again.

    Neil McClain II and family
    Taylorsville, Ky

  • In many homes here in Spencer County, as well as across the nation, you’ll find refrigerators covered with children’s art work, photos, test papers and even glowing report cards. It seems the fridge is where families often do their boasting.

    Depending on the number of children, and their performance, it doesn’t take long for many of those refrigerator doors to get covered with copies of that perfect spelling test, the newspaper clipping or the blue ribbon won at the county fair.

  • I would like to make a suggestion to help eliminate some road litter and clean up our county. People post signs for yard sales, garage sales, birthday parties, weddings, etc., which is fine, but quite a few of them never get removed. They eventually become detached from where they were hanging and become roadside litter.

    Most of these signs have the date of the event and the address, so why not have a time limit for when they need to be removed? Twenty-four hours after the event seems like a fair amount of time.

  • These days it seems like we hear so much about what is going wrong with our community’s young people.  Ever feel scared about what the next generation is going to be like?

    If you are ever feeling disenchanted about the youth in our community please take a moment to go watch football players help get elementary kiddos out of their cars each home game Friday.

  • Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin found himself the target of frenzied liberals last week following a speech he gave to a group of Christian conservatives. He was falsely accused of inciting violence and calling for bloodshed in the event of a Hillary Clinton victory in the November presidential election.

    You can watch his speech on Youtube. In fact, I would encourage you to watch his speech on Youtube. Right now, before we go any further. It’s only about 16 minutes. I’ll wait for you.

  • Congressional committees are jokingly referred to as the place where bills go to die.  However, I’m happy to report that my bipartisan bill to audit the Federal Reserve passed the House Oversight and Government Reform committee by unanimous consent this summer, and is now eligible to come before the full House for a vote.  Since 90 percent of bills die in committee, you could say that my legislation had a near-death experience, but that’s a good thing.

  • As a member of the Kentucky Legislative Sportsmen’s Caucus, I am proud to join like-minded sportsmen-legislators from across the nation in celebrating the 44th National Hunting and Fishing Day on Saturday, September 24. In observance of this occasion, Governor Matt Bevin has proclaimed it to be Hunting and Fishing Day in Kentucky.

  • On September 10, the Spencer County Animal Shelter had an extremely successful Open House. The shelter collected significant cash donations, as well as desperately needed supplies. This would have been unheard of just a year ago.

  • Like most everyone else, 15 years ago, I was glued to the television set watching the images out of New York City, Washington, D.C., and that eerie field in Pennsylvania, and quietly wondered if there was more yet to come.

    In the hours after terrorists hijacked planes and delivered the most brutal attack on American soil in history, I was struck by the frailty of man, even man in the most powerful nation on earth. It was a sobering reminder that all that man has built or created can be diminished to rubble in the blink of an eye.

  • Whether or not county employees deserve a pay raise as proposed by Judge-Executive John Riley is open for debate. However, what county employees do deserve is an apology and a whole lot more respect than they were shown during last week’s fiscal court meeting.

  • There are two documents of paramount importance to American history: the Declaration of Independence, which forged our national identity, and the United States Constitution, which set forth the framework for the federal government that is still in use today. While Independence Day is a beloved national holiday, fewer people know about Constitution Week, an annual commemoration of the living document that upholds and protects the freedoms central to our American way of life. This year, the annual celebration begins September 17, 2016.

  • I would like to thank everyone that helped make my Eagle Scout project a big success. First of all, I would like to thank Ken Thompson, who, sadly, passed away before the project was completed. He suggested the project to me and gave me the paint.

    The project was to repair and paint the community gazebo out in front of the Spencer County High School.

    I would also like to thank the many businesses who donated supplies, water, food and other items.

  • If I remember correctly from my Boy Scout days, one of the first priorities when you come upon a badly injured person who is losing lots of blood, is to stop the bleeding.

    So we learned how to apply direct pressure, put on bandages, and if worse came to worse - put on a tourniquet.

  • As we transition into September and children are settling into their school year routines, I am excited to participate once again in the America’s Legislators Back to School Program. Hosted by the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL), the program helps legislators educate young constituents in their classrooms on the values of civic participation and the legislative process.

  • Amye Bensenhaver likes to talk. There’s no denying that. She’s talks fast, too, like she’s afraid she won’t be able to give you all the information she has before the next question comes. And Amye has a lot of information.

    That is, of course, why I called her.

  • House Republicans planned to boycott Tuesday’s special meeting of House members called by Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo, House Republican Leader Jeff Hoover said Monday.

    In a news release, Hoover called the meeting a “charade” and said it was a way for Stumbo to pay House Democrats for a day of salary and expenses for coming to Frankfort for Tuesday evening’s political fundraiser for the House Democratic caucus.

  • Then don’t fix it.

    There’s wisdom in that logic and it seems to mirror the philosophy the Taylorsville City Commission used when it voted to promote Major Kenny Stewart to the position of Police Chief last week.

  • Forty summers ago, Rick Monday of the Chicago Cubs ran across the outfield at Dodger Stadium and swiped an American flag that had been laid on the ground, covered with lighter fluid, and was about to be set ablaze by two young men.

    In the summer of 1976 tensions were still high over the Vietnam War, racial tensions were at a fever pitch in some American cities over forced busing, and protesters were demanding their rights to express themselves.

    Not much has changed.

  • Legislation during this year’s General Assembly requiring disclosure of public retirement benefits for all current and former lawmakers, “including their name, status, and projected or actual retirement benefit payments,” passed the Republican-run state Senate with unanimous, bipartisan support from all 38 senators and flew through the Democratically controlled House State Government Committee with 19 of the 21 members who voted approving it.